A Host-Produced Autoinducer-2 Mimic Activates Bacterial Quorum Sensing.

TitleA Host-Produced Autoinducer-2 Mimic Activates Bacterial Quorum Sensing.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsIsmail, AS, Valastyan, JS, Bassler, BL
JournalCell Host Microbe
Volume19
Issue4
Pagination470-80
Date Published2016 Apr 13
ISSN1934-6069
KeywordsAnimals, Bacterial Proteins, Epithelial Cells, Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial, Homoserine, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Lactones, Quorum Sensing, Salmonella Infections, Salmonella typhimurium
Abstract

<p>Host-microbial symbioses are vital to health; nonetheless, little is known about the role crosskingdom signaling plays in these relationships. In a process called quorum sensing, bacteria communicate with one another using extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. One autoinducer, AI-2, is proposed to promote interspecies bacterial communication, including in the mammalian gut. We show that mammalian epithelia produce an AI-2 mimic activity in response to bacteria or tight-junction disruption. This AI-2 mimic is detected by the bacterial AI-2 receptor, LuxP/LsrB, and can activate quorum-sensing-controlled gene expression, including in the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. AI-2 mimic activity is induced when epithelia are directly or indirectly exposed to bacteria, suggesting that a secreted bacterial component(s) stimulates its production. Mutagenesis revealed genes required for bacteria to both detect and stimulate production of the AI-2 mimic. These findings uncover a potential role for the mammalian AI-2 mimic in fostering crosskingdom signaling and host-bacterial symbioses.</p>

DOI10.1016/j.chom.2016.02.020
Alternate JournalCell Host Microbe
PubMed ID26996306
PubMed Central IDPMC4869860
Grant ListR01 GM065859 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
F32 GM100711 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
5F32GM100711-02 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
/ / Howard Hughes Medical Institute / United States
R37 GM065859 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
5R01GM065859 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States