Princeton University Molecular Biology - Molecular Biology Events http://molbio.princeton.edu Fri, 05 Feb 2016 12:04:55 -0500 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Scott Waddell (Oxford) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/464-waddell http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/464-waddell Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Dec 16, 2015 - Wed, Dec 16, 2015
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Photo of Scott Waddell

Scott Waddell, Ph.D.

Professor of Neurobiology
Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics
Medical Science Division
University of Oxford 

Seminar Topic

Neural mechanisms of behavioral control in Drosophila

Learning permits animals to attach meaning and context to sensory stimuli. We are interested in how memories are coded in neural networks in the brain, and appropriately retrieved and utilized to guide behavior. In the fruit fly olfactory memories of particular value are represented within sparse populations of odor-activated Kenyon cells (KCs) in the mushroom body ensemble. Current models suggest that during learning reinforcing dopaminergic neurons skew the mushroom body network by driving zonally-restricted plasticity at synaptic junctions between the KCs and subsets of the overall small collection of mushroom body output neurons. Reactivation of the skewed KC-output neuron network retrieves memory of odor valence and guides appropriate approach or avoidance behavior. Our recent work suggests that skews in the KC-output neuron network might also account for state-dependent memory retrieval and memory re-evaluation.

Research LAB

Waddell Group

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Ajeet Singh (Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/491-singh http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/491-singh Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Special Seminar
Date: Wed, Jan 06, 2016 - Wed, Jan 06, 2016
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Special Seminar

Speaker
Ajeet Singh
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology

Ajeet is currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Nüsslein-Volhard lab at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tuebingen. He is broadly interested in understanding how diverse cell types are generated from multipotent adult progenitors and how these cells interact to give rise to complex patterns over a tissue and organism-scale. 

Seminar Topic

Cellular Basis for Color Pattern in Zebrafish

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public.

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Special Seminar Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Sarah A. Port (U of Göttingen) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/494-port http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/494-port Location: Schultz Lab, 318 - Princeton
Category: Informal Seminar
Date: Mon, Jan 11, 2016 - Mon, Jan 11, 2016
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Informal Seminar

Speaker

Sarah A. Port, Ph.D.
Department of Molecular Biology
University of Göttingen 

Seminar Topic

"Structural and Functional Characterization of CRM1-Nup214 Interactions Reveals Multiple FG-Binding Sites Involved in Nuclear Export"

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public.

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Informal Seminar Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Martin Jonikas (Carnegie Institution for Science) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/489-jonikas http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/489-jonikas Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Special Seminar
Date: Mon, Jan 11, 2016 - Mon, Jan 11, 2016
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Special Seminar

Speaker
Jonikas
Martin Jonikas
Carnegie Institution for Science
Martin Jonikas is a Young Investigator at the Carnegie Institution for Science and an Assistant Professor by courtesy at Stanford University. His laboratory aims to enable transformative advances in sustainability by bringing systems and synthetic biology to photosynthetic organisms. He studied aerospace engineering as an undergraduate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He then received his Ph.D. from the University of California, San Francisco working with Jonathan Weissman, Maya Schuldiner and Peter Walter on high-throughput genetics and protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. He is the recipient of several awards, including a 2015 NIH New Innovator Award, a 2010 Air Force Young Investigator Award and a 2005 National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.
Seminar Topic

Systems and Synthetic Biology of Photosynthetic Organisms

Jonikas seminar illustration

Photosynthetic organisms, our planet's greatest chemists, form the foundations for human health by providing us with food, fuel, materials and drugs. Yet, our understanding of these organisms is in its infancy. My laboratory aims to enable transformative advances in sustainability by bringing systems and synthetic biology to photosynthetic organisms.

We have brought high-throughput genetics to photosynthetic eukaryotes by generating the first indexed, genome-wide collection of mutants in a single-celled photosynthetic organism, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We have also developed tools for systematically determining the localizations of hundreds of proteins in this organism.

I will illustrate how these tools have allowed us to discover the mechanism of formation of the pyrenoid, a mysterious and overlooked algal organelle that performs approximately one-third of global carbon fixation. I will further discuss our early efforts as part of an international collaboration to transfer this organelle into crops to enhance their productivity.

Research Lab

https://dpb.carnegiescience.edu/labs/jonikas-lab

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Special Seminar Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Chan Tu (Columbia U) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/495-tu http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/495-tu Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Special Seminar
Date: Wed, Jan 20, 2016 - Wed, Jan 20, 2016
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Special Seminar

Speaker
Chan Tu
Chan Thu
Columbia University
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics 
Seminar Topic

Molecular mechanisms of neuronal self-recognition mediated by the clustered protocadherins

thu-scientificimageA key principle of neural circuit assembly is neurite self-avoidance, whereby sister axons or dendrites of the same neuron repel each other. This process is necessary to achieve efficient coverage of projection or receptive fields. Remarkably, however, sister neurites engaged is self-avoidance interact freely with other neurons, indicating that   neurons can discriminate “self” from “non-self”. Self-identity of neuron is determined by stochastic expression of a distinct set of cadherin superfamily members called clustered protocadherin (Pcdh) α, β and γ proteins in mammals.

In order to better understand to role of individual Pcdh isoforms in generating single cell diversity, we have carried out detailed functional and structural studies of the clustered Pcdhs (in collaboration with the groups of Larry Shapiro and Barry Honig at Columbia). Using a cell aggregation assay for homophilic interactions of distinct Pcdh isoforms, we have found that individual Pcdh α, β and γ protein isoforms exhibit strict homophilic binding, and that multiple distinct Pcdh isoforms can act combinatorially to generate unique multi- isoform trans binding specificities. Based on our findings from X-ray 3D structures and computational studies, we proposed that sister neurites from the same neuron can form a large assembly or lattice of Pcdh units through specific homophilic interactions. In contrast, non-sister neurites displaying different Pcdh isoform compositions would incorporate mismatches, preventing the formation of the lattice.  Thus, the size of Pcdh complexes or lattice at the site of contacts may determine the strength of downstream signaling leading to neurite repulsion in vivo. Our detailed structure studies provide the molecular nature of Pcdh homophilic interactions and the mechanisms by which the clustered Pcdhs provide individual neurons with a unique cell surface identity.

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Special Seminar Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Jeannie T. Lee (Harvard) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/466-lee http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/466-lee Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Jan 27, 2016 - Wed, Jan 27, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Jeannie

Jeannie T. Lee, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor of Genetics and Pathology
Harvard Medical School

Molecular Biologist
Massachusetts General Hospital
 
HHMI Investigator
Jeannie T. Lee is an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, and a Member of the National Academy of Sciences. She is also Co-Director of the Harvard Epigenetics Initiative. Dr. Lee specializes in the study of epigenetic regulation by long noncoding RNAs and employs X-chromosome inactivation as a model system. For her work on RNA-mediated chromatin change, Dr. Lee became the recipient of the 2010 Molecular Biology Prize from the National Academy of Sciences, is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and was named a Distinguished Graduate Award of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. She received her A.B. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Harvard University, obtained M.D.-Ph.D. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and did postgraduate training at the Whitehead Institute/MIT and at the Massachusetts General Hospital. She was also a Basil O’Connor Scholar and a Pew Scholars, and, until recently, served on the Board of Directors of the Genetics Society of America. In 2011, she co-founded RaNA Therapeutics to harness the potential of long noncoding RNAs to treat disease./td>
Seminar Topic

X-inactivation as a model for epigenetic regulation by long noncoding RNA

Research LAB

Jeannie Lee Lab

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Shelby Blythe (Princeton U) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/496-blythe http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/496-blythe Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Special Seminar
Date: Wed, Feb 03, 2016 - Wed, Feb 03, 2016
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Special Seminar

Speaker
shelby
Shelby Blythe
Deapartment of Molecular Biology
Princeton University
Seminar Topic

Transcription, chromatin remodeling, and cell cycle control during early embryogenesis

Shelby ResearchHistorically, our knowledge of the genetic interactions that shape and pattern the embryo has far surpassed our understanding of how chromatin structure regulates gene expression. I have developed technologies for measuring chromatin accessibility (ATAC-seq) and occupancy (ChIP-seq) to address how changes in chromatin structure operate over short (3 to 20 minute) timescales to alter the gene-regulatory landscape in Drosophila embryos. With these approaches, I have measured the large scale remodeling events that establish a chromatin ‘ground state’, and have characterized how spatially restricted patterns of chromatin accessibility arise in response to patterning information. These large scale changes in chromatin structure are functionally linked to simultaneous cell cycle remodeling events. By exploring this functional interaction, I have developed genetic approaches for identifying rate-limiting factors for driving the large scale coordinated remodeling of embryonic promoters. These experiments serve as the basis for the future systematic examination of how fine-scale control of chromatin architecture underlies the embryonic developmental program.

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public.

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Special Seminar Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
SMART Goals for a Heart Healthy Lifestyle http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/497-smart http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/497-smart Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 118 - Princeton
Category: Fun Committee
Date: Fri, Feb 05, 2016 - Fri, Feb 05, 2016
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Fun Committee Events

In honor of National Heart Month and Go Red for Women Day, University Health Coaches will offer a presentation for the MOL BIO community focused on providing easy-to-incorporate strategies to improve and maintain your heart health.  Learn to set SMART Goals for successful heart-healthy lifestyle.

resented by:  Gerry Pierre and Lisa Calabrese, University Health Coaches

Lunch will be available; attendance for this event is limited to 25.  RSVP by February 1.

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Fun Committee Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Yukiko Yamashita (U of Michigan) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/465-yamashita http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/465-yamashita Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Feb 17, 2016 - Wed, Feb 17, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Photo of Yukiko Yamashita

Yukiko Yamashita, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology
University of Michigan

Research Associate Professor
Center for Stem Cell Biology
Life Sciences Institute
 
HHMI Investigator

Yukiko Yamashita obtained her Ph.D. from Kyoto University, Japan; completing the postdoctoral fellowship with Minx Fuller at Stanford University.  She started her own laboratory at the University of Michigan in 2007, and is currently an associate professor at the University of Michigan.

She studies how adult stem cells divide asymmetrically, giving rise to one stem cell and one differentiating cell, to maintain tissue homeostasis in the context of the stem cell niche. The particular focus is on how general cell biological processes, such as cell cycle regulation and cytoskeleton organization, which are shared by many other non-stem cells, are modulated in a stem cell-specific manner to fulfill stem cell function. 

Yamashita is a recipient of 2008 Searle Scholar Award, 2009 ASCB WICB junior award, 2011 MacArthur Fellowship, and is an HHMI investigator since 2014. 

Seminar Topic

Asymmetric stem cell division in tissue homeostasis

Adult stem cells continuously supply highly differentiated but short-lived cells, such as blood, skin, intestinal epithelium, and sperm cells, throughout life. To maintain the balance between stem cells and differentiating cells, a failure of which may lead to tumorigenesis through excess self-renewal or tissue degeneration through excess differentiation, many stem cells have the potential to divide asymmetrically so that each division produces one stem cell and one differentiating cell.

Drosophila male germ line stem cells (GSCs) serve as an ideal model system to study stem cell behavior. They reside in the stem cell niche, which specify stem cell identity by sending essential signal(s). Stem cells have elaborate cellular mechanisms to ensure the asymmetric outcome of the division, producing one stem cell and one differentiating cell, which is the key to tissue homeostasis.

I will present the latest discoveries on the mechanisms that ensure asymmetric outcome of the stem cell divisions.

Research LAB

Yukiko Yamashita Lab

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Kush M. Parmar (5AM Ventures) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/492-parmar http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/492-parmar Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: MOL BIO Translational Research Seminar
Date: Fri, Feb 19, 2016 - Fri, Feb 19, 2016
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MOL BIO Translational Research Seminar 

Speaker

Kush M. Parmar

Kush M. Parmar, M.D., Ph.D.
Managing Partner
5AM Ventures

 
Seminar Topic

Bridging two worlds: advancing academic science into biotech in the new age of biomedical innovation

The way medicines are discovered and developed has changed dramatically in the past decade, increasingly bringing the worlds of academia and industry far closer together in the pursuit of therapeutic advances. Industry’s eagerness to partner at earlier stages notwithstanding, key elements around a scientific breakthrough need to be in place to improve its prospects of ultimately being successful. Relevant examples of this new ecosystem will be shared through the lens of a Department of Molecular Biology alumnus who transitioned from academia to biotech venture capital and entrepreneurship. Importantly, as the world of biomedical innovation continues to evolve, so have the requirements and paths for academic discoveries to make their way into industry. Based on a few case studies and observations from the “front lines” of biotech entrepreneurship, some thoughts and advice for aspiring life sciences entrepreneurs will be shared.

Kush is a Managing Partner at 5 AM Ventures, a venture capital firm "dedicated to creating value in early-stage life science companies." Kush was in the Wieschaus lab as a Molecular Biology and Medieval Studies major at Princeton, and also holds a PhD in Experimental Pathology from Harvard University and an MD from Harvard Medical School. He previously served as Acting VP of Strategy and Corporate Development at Novira, and as Board Observer for Envoy Achaogen, and Pulmatrix. Kush recently joined the Advisory Council of the Department of Molecular Biology.

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public.

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MOL BIO Translational Research Seminar Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Suzanne Eaton (Max Planck Institute) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/467-eaton http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/467-eaton Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Feb 24, 2016 - Wed, Feb 24, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Suzanne Eaton

Suzanne Eaton, Ph.D.
Research Group Leader
Max Planck Institute
Suzanne Eaton is a senior research group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, and Professor at the Dresden Technical University. She obtained her PhD from UCLA studying immunoglobulin gene transcription.  She moved into developmental biology as a postdoc with Tom Kornberg at UCSF, where she worked on identifying the signaling circuits that set up the AP boundary organizer in Drosophila wing discs. To more deeply understand the cell biological mechanisms underlying epithelial development, she moved to the EMBL Cell Biology Programme for a second postdoc with Kai Simons. Her own research group (since 1999) has focused on the cell biological and biophysical mechanisms underlying development, encompassing topics that range from tissue mechanics through signaling and metabolism.
Seminar Topic

Mechanics of Drosophila pupal wing morphogenesis: an interplay between active and stress-induced cell dynamics

Research LAB

Suzanne Eaton Research

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Andy Minn (Penn) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/468-minn http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/468-minn Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Mar 02, 2016 - Wed, Mar 02, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Photo of Andy Minn

Andy J. Minn, MD., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology
University of Pennsylvania
Seminar Topic

TBA

Research 

Andy J. Minn Profile

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Zhijian Chen (UT Southwestern Medical Center) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/469-chen http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/469-chen Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Mar 09, 2016 - Wed, Mar 09, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

photo of Zjijian

Zhijian "James" Chen
Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
George L. MacGregor Distinguished Chair in Biomedical Science
Professor, Department of Molecular Biology
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Seminar Topic

TBA

Research 

Zhijian Chen Faculty Profile

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Daniel Portnoy (UC, Berkeley) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/470-portnoy http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/470-portnoy Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Mar 23, 2016 - Wed, Mar 23, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Photo of Dan Portnoy

Daniel Portnoy
Edward E. Penhoet Distinguished Chair in Global Public Health and Infectious Diseases 
Professor of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology
University of California, Berkeley
Seminar Topic

TBA

Research 

The Portnoy Lab

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Anne Brunet (Stanford U) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/471-brunet http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/471-brunet Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Mar 30, 2016 - Wed, Mar 30, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Anne Brunet

Anne Brunet
Professor of Genetics
Stanford School of Medicine
Seminar Topic

TBA

Research 

The Brunet Lab

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Kenneth Yamada (NIH) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/472-yamada http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/472-yamada Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Apr 06, 2016 - Wed, Apr 06, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Photo of Ken Yamada

Kenneth Yamada, MD., Ph.D.
NIH Distinguished Investigator 
Chief, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Biology
Head, Cell Biology Section
National Institutes of Health/NIDCR 
Seminar Topic

TBA

Research 

Kenneth Yamada Profile

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Roger Perlmutter http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/493-perlmutter http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/493-perlmutter Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Gilbert Lecture Series
Date: Thu, Apr 07, 2016 - Thu, Apr 07, 2016
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Gilbert Lecture Series

Speaker

Roger Perlmutter  

Seminar Topic

TBA

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public.

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Gilbert Lecture Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Marc Tessier-Lavigne (Rockefeller) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/473-yamada http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/473-yamada Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Apr 13, 2016 - Wed, Apr 13, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Photo of Marc Tessier-Lavigne

Marc Tessier-Lavigne 
President  and Carson Family Professor
The Rockefeller University
Seminar Topic

TBA

Research 

Lab of Brain Development and Repair

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Yifan Cheng (UC, SanFrancisco) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/474-cheng http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/474-cheng Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Apr 20, 2016 - Wed, Apr 20, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Photo of Yifan Cheng

Yifan Cheng, Ph.D. (程亦凡)
Associate Professor
Biochemistry and Biophysics 
University of California, San Francisco 
School of Medicine 
Seminar Topic

TBA

Research 

Yifan Cheng Lab

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Leor Weinberger (UC, San Francisco) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/475-cheng http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/475-cheng Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Apr 27, 2016 - Wed, Apr 27, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Photo of Leor Weinberger

Leor S. Winberger, Ph.D.
Associate Investigator, Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology
Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics
University of California, San Francisco
Seminar Topic

TBA

Research 

Weinberger Lab - Virology and Immunology

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400