Princeton University Molecular Biology - Molecular Biology Events http://molbio.princeton.edu Wed, 23 Apr 2014 08:53:57 -0400 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Doris Tsao (CalTech) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/306-Tsao http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/306-Tsao Location: No Location Available (TBD) -
Category: Princeton Neuroscience Institute
Date: Thu, Apr 03, 2014 - Thu, Apr 03, 2014
Add Description:

Neuroscience Seminar Series

Speaker

Doris Tsao

Doris Tsao
California Institute of Technology
 
Mission The goal of our research is to understand the brain mechanisms for object recognition and spatial vision in primates. How does the brain construct a geometrically accurate percept of 3D space and how does it recognize the myriad objects within it? Approach he primate visual system contains a large number of distinct areas specialized for different functions. We use fMRI in alert monkeys to identify the regions most activated by a specific visual function, and then we use electrophysiology, microstimulation, optogenetics, anatomical tracing, and mathematical modeling to understand the detailed processing occurring within these areas. FMRI gives a global perspective of activity across the entire brain, revealing all the activated areas, while targeted single-unit recordings allow one to understand the function of each area in terms of spiking patterns of single neurons.

Hosted by Sabine Kastner

 
Seminar Topic

TBA

research lab

http://tsaolab.caltech.edu/?q=People_Tsao

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

]]>
Princeton Neuroscience Institute Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Mark Churchland (Columbia) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/307-Churchland http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/307-Churchland Location: No Location Available (TBD) -
Category: Princeton Neuroscience Institute
Date: Thu, Apr 10, 2014 - Thu, Apr 10, 2014
Add Description:

Neuroscience Seminar Series

Speaker

Mark Churchland

Mark Churchland
Columbia University
 
Your brain, and the neurons within it, respond to external stimuli such as a friend's face or voice. At the other extreme, the final output of your brain is a set of commands sent to your muscles. Yet most of the brain's activity is neither a reflexive response nor a direct motor command. The brain sustains and generates its own activity, and this is at the heart of the remarkable feats it can accomplish.

A central goal of our laboratory is to understand the neural dynamics that allow the brain to generate its own activity. We approach this problem in the context of voluntary movement. Voluntary movement requires a series of internally generated events that must unfold over time before the overt movement is produced. This gives us a unique opportunity to study activity that is internally generated but still relates to measureable events (e.g., the speed or accuracy of a movement).

We take a dynamical systems approach to understanding the neural events that drive movement. We are particularly interested in uncovering the 'rules of neural motion.' In this view, the right way to understand internally generated activity is to decipher how and why the neural 'state' at one moment in time leads to the neural state at the next moment in time.

Our belief is that an understanding of neural dynamics will shed a great deal of light on how the brain generates and controls movement normally, and on how this process can go awry in disease.

 
Seminar Topic

TBA

research lab

http://churchlandlab.neuroscience.columbia.edu/

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

]]>
Princeton Neuroscience Institute Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
David Heeger (NYU) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/308-Heeger http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/308-Heeger Location: No Location Available (TBD) -
Category: Princeton Neuroscience Institute
Date: Thu, Apr 17, 2014 - Thu, Apr 17, 2014
Add Description:

Neuroscience Seminar Series

Speaker

david heeger

David Heeger
New York University
 
The research spans an interdisciplinary cross-section of engineering, psychology, and neuroscience. In the fields of perceptual psychology and systems/cognitive neuroscience, we have worked on computational models of neuronal processing in the visual system, psychophysical (perceptual psychology) measurements of human vision, and neuroimaging. In the fields of image processing, computer vision, and computer graphics, we have worked on motion estimation and image registration, wavelet image representations, anisotropic diffusion (edge-preserving noise reduction), image fidelity metrics (for evaluating image data compression algorithms), texture analysis/synthesis and scientific visualization.
 
Seminar Topic

TBA

research lab

http://www.cns.nyu.edu/heegerlab/?page=home

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

]]>
Princeton Neuroscience Institute Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Rui Costa (Champalimaud) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/309-Costa http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/309-Costa Location: PNI, Room A32 -
Category: Princeton Neuroscience Institute
Date: Thu, Apr 24, 2014 - Thu, Apr 24, 2014
Add Description:

Neuroscience Seminar Series

Speaker

Rui-Costa

Rui Costa
Champalimaud Center for the Unknown
 
To study actions is to study the way we do things, which is different than studying how we remember stimuli, or facts and events. Some actions are innate or pre-wired (like swallowing or breathing). Others are learned anew throughout life, likely through a process of trial and feedback. We currently focus on understanding the processes mediating the latter.

A growing body of evidence suggests that cortico-basal ganglia circuits are involved in action generation and selection, in skill learning, and in learning goal-directed actions and habits. We center our efforts on investigating the cortico-basal ganglia mechanisms underlying these processes using an across-level approach, from molecules to circuits.

We chose to implement this integrative approach in mice because they combine the power of genetics, a mammalian brain with canonical cortico-basal ganglia loops that can generate and propagate oscillatory activity, and the possibility of accurately quantifying simple behaviors like action initiation (with EMG recordings or using inertial sensors) and stereotypic skill learning, and more elaborate behaviors like goal-directed actions.

 
Seminar Topic

Generating and shaping novel action repertoires

research lab

http://www.neuro.fchampalimaud.org/en/research/investigators/research-groups/group/Costa/

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

]]>
Princeton Neuroscience Institute Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Edward Chang (UC Berkeley.SF) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/310-Chang http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/310-Chang Location: No Location Available (TBD) -
Category: Princeton Neuroscience Institute
Date: Thu, May 01, 2014 - Thu, May 01, 2014
Add Description:

Neuroscience Seminar Series

Speaker

chang edward

Edward Chang
UC Berkeley and San Francisco
 
Dr. Edward Chang directs a clinical research program that focuses on outcomes, decision-making, and safety improvement of cutting-edge treatments for epilepsy and trigeminal neuralgia. His basic research laboratory is dedicated to discovering the basic cortical mechanisms of speech processing, and transforming those insights to innovative new brain mapping algorithms and assistive neuroprosthetic devices for paralysis.
 
 
Seminar Topic

TBA

research lab

http://neurosurgery.ucsf.edu/index.php/research_epilepsy_pain_chang.html

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

]]>
Princeton Neuroscience Institute Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Alex Huk (UT Austin) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/311-Huk http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/event/311-Huk Location: No Location Available (TBD) -
Category: Princeton Neuroscience Institute
Date: Thu, May 08, 2014 - Thu, May 08, 2014
Add Description:

Neuroscience Seminar Series

Speaker

Alex Huk

Alex Huk
The University of Texas at Austin
 
Research in our lab focuses on how we see things move. We treat visual motion as a model system for investigating how the brain integrates information over space and time— as well as how these neural signals guide intelligent actions in a dynamic world.

Focusing our efforts within this framework allows us to study both the encoding and decoding of neural signals along a continuous pathway in the primate brain. In essence, we take an empirical perspective towards the underlying goal of understanding the neural code in cortex, i.e., what do action potentials and spike trains mean, given their location in the circuit and within a particular behavioral context?

The lab employs a variety of methods, including single-unit electrophysiology (with a current emphasis on multiple-neuron / multiple-area simultaneous recordings), functional magnetic resonance imaging, psychophysics, and computational modeling.

 
Seminar Topic

TBA

research lab

http://www.cps.utexas.edu/wordpress/

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

]]>
Princeton Neuroscience Institute Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400