Princeton University Molecular Biology - Archived Events http://molbio.princeton.edu Mon, 30 Mar 2015 07:33:37 -0400 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb 2015 Mid-Atlantic Society for Developmental Biology Meeting http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/416-2015-mid-atlantic-society-for-developmental-biology-meeting http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/416-2015-mid-atlantic-society-for-developmental-biology-meeting Location: McDonnell Hall, A01 -
Category: Developmental Biology Meeting
Date: Fri, Mar 27, 2015 - Sat, Mar 28, 2015
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Princeton University is pleased to host the 2015 Mid-Atlantic Society Developmental Biology Meeting.  This conference is partly supported by a grant from the Society for Developmental Biology.

Please visit http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/sdb for information about this meeting.

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Developmental Biology Meeting Wed, 04 Feb 2015 15:57:38 -0500
Karlene Cimprich (Stanford) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/370-cimprich http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/370-cimprich Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Mar 25, 2015 - Wed, Mar 25, 2015
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
Cimprich
Karlene Cimprich, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology
Stanford University School of Medicine
 

Karlene Cimprich is Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology at Stanford University School of Medicine.  Karlene received her B.S. in Chemistry at the University of Notre Dame and her Ph.D. in Chemistry at Harvard University. Her lab focuses on genome stability pathways and their roles in cancer and other human diseases; DNA damage response pathways and DNA replication; the interface between RNA processing and transcription with genome stability.

Seminar Topic

 
RNA Meets DNA: Novel Mechanisms for RNA-Induced Genome Instability

Our genomes are constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous sources of DNA damage, and one structure that poses a problem for cells is the R-loop, a three-stranded nucleic acid structure consisting of an RNA-DNA hybrid and displaced single-stranded DNA. R-loops are thought to form during transcription when the nascent RNA transcript hybridizes with the DNA template, and they are physiological structures that regulate various cellular processes occurring on chromatin. However, unscheduled R-loops, which can arise when factors that normally regulate their formation are perturbed, can lead to the accumulation of DNA damage. In this talk, we will summarize recent findings about the mechanisms by which R-loops lead to DNA damage and a physiological system we are studying in which R-loops may drive genome instability.
 

Research lab


http://cimprich.stanford.edu/

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Sean Megason (Harvard Medical School) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/424-sean-megason-harvard-medical-school http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/424-sean-megason-harvard-medical-school Location: Carl Icahn Lab, 101 - Princeton
Category: Quantitative & Computional Biology
Date: Mon, Mar 23, 2015 - Mon, Mar 23, 2015
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Quantitative & Computional Biology Fri, 06 Feb 2015 16:24:33 -0500
Mark Browne (Andor Technology) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/426-mark-browne-andor-technology http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/426-mark-browne-andor-technology Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Confocal Microscopy
Date: Mon, Mar 16, 2015 - Mon, Mar 16, 2015
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Confocal Seminar

Speaker
 
Mark Browne, Ph.D.
Director, Systems Division
Andor Technology
 
Seminar Topic

Innovations in high speed, live specimen confocal imaging

WD Spinning Disc System with Borealis Technology

Demonstration 3/17-3/19

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Confocal Microscopy Wed, 11 Mar 2015 11:11:25 -0400
Michael Rape (UC, Berkeley) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/369-rape http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/369-rape Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Mar 11, 2015 - Wed, Mar 11, 2015
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
 Michael Rape photo
Michael Rape, Ph.D.
Investigator, HHMI
Dr. K. Peter Hirth Chair in Cancer Biology and Professor in Cell and Developmental Biology, UC Berkeley

Michael Rape performed his graduate work with Stefan Jentsch at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany, where is discovered the p97/CDC48 complex as the first ubiquitin-dependent segregase. His postdoctoral work was performed with Marc Kirschner at Harvard Medical School, where Michael studied regulation of cell cycle control by the anaphase-promoting complex. In late 2006, Michael started his own lab at UC Berkeley, where he is currently a Professor in Cell and Developmental Biology and the Dr. K. Peter Hirth Chair in Cancer Biology. Michael has also co-founded a biotech company, Nurix. Awards include the Pew Scholars Award, the Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise, a Blavatnik Science Scholar, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator Award.

Seminar Topic

 
Building a face, one ubiquitin at a time

Although ubiquitylation is known to control many aspects of cellular homeostasis, its function during cell differentiation programs remains incompletely understood. By combining high-throughput siRNA screens with expression analyses in stem cells, we have discovered a novel ubiquitylation enzyme that controls differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into neural crest. Loss of this ubiquitin ligase or its substrate results in craniofacial disorders caused by reduced numbers of neural crest cells. Importantly, by dissecting the molecular mechanism of this ubiquitin-dependent differentiation event, we revealed intriguing insight into cellular pathways that ultimately control cell fate decisions.
 

Research lab


http://mcb.berkeley.edu/labs/rape/

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Alex Mogilner (NYU) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/418-alex-mogilner-nyu http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/418-alex-mogilner-nyu Location: Carl Icahn Lab, 101 - Princeton
Category: Quantitative & Computional Biology
Date: Mon, Mar 09, 2015 - Mon, Mar 09, 2015
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Quantitative & Computional Biology Fri, 06 Feb 2015 16:24:33 -0500
Carl-Philipp Heisenberg (IST Austria) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/368-carl-philipp-heisenberg-ist-austria http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/368-carl-philipp-heisenberg-ist-austria Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Mar 04, 2015 - Wed, Mar 04, 2015
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
Carl
Carl-Philipp Heisenberg, Ph.D.
Institute of Science and Technology Austria, Klosterneuburg, Austria


Carl Philipp Heisenberg is professor at IST Austria.  He received his Ph.D. from Max-Planck-Institute of Developmental Biology Tübingen. The Heisenberg Lab is studying various forms of cell interactions underlying the development of multicellular structures, such as tissues, organs and embryos, using zebrafish gastrulation as an assay system.

Seminar Topic

 

Surface cell expansion drives radial cell intercalations in zebrafish gastrulation

Radial cell intercalations are commonly associated with tissue spreading in many developmental and disease-related processes. Yet, how radial cell intercalations are controlled and function in tissue spreading remains unknown. Here, we use a combination of experiments and theory to analyze radial cell intercalations during doming, the initial spreading of the blastoderm over the yolk cell at early zebrafish gastrulation. Strikingly, we found that radial cell intercalations do not drive doming, but rather determine the viscous relaxation behavior of the blastoderm in response to tissue surface tension (TST)-driven deformation. We further show that the expansion of surface epithelial cells reduces TST, which in turn triggers radial cell intercalations and doming. Thus, radial cell intercalations are required for translating changes in tissue-scale forces into tissue deformation.
 

Research lab


http://ist.ac.at/research-groups-pages/heisenberg-group/

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Sergey Nuhzdin (USC) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/417-sergey-nuhzdin-usc http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/417-sergey-nuhzdin-usc Location: Carl Icahn Lab, 101 - Princeton
Category: Quantitative & Computional Biology
Date: Mon, Mar 02, 2015 - Mon, Mar 02, 2015
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Quantitative & Computional Biology Fri, 06 Feb 2015 16:24:33 -0500
Eve Marder (Brandeis U) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/404-marder http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/404-marder Location: PNI, Room A32 -
Category: Neuroscience Seminar Series
Date: Thu, Feb 26, 2015 - Thu, Feb 26, 2015
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Neuroscience Seminar Series

Speaker
Eve Marder
Eve Marder, Ph.D.
Brandeis University

Seminar Topic

 
TBA
 

FAculty Lab


https://blogs.brandeis.edu/marderlab/

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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Neuroscience Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Jody Rosenblatt (U of Utah) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/367-rosenblatt http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/367-rosenblatt Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Feb 25, 2015 - Wed, Feb 25, 2015
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
Jody
Judy Rosenblatt, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Oncological Sciences, University of Utah
Huntsman Cancer Institute Investigator

Jody Rosenblatt is Associate Professor of Oncological Sciences at the University of Utah and Investigator at the Huntsman Cancer Institute.  Dr. Rosenblatt received her B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley and her Ph.D. from the University of California, San Francisco working with Dr. Timothy Mitchison.  As a post-doctoral fellow at the MRC-LMCB at University College London, she discovered epithelial cell extrusion; a process that eliminates dying cells without forming any gaps. Her lab found that typically when epithelial cells die during normal turnover, they do so by first extruding live cells when cell numbers become too dense. Extrusion is critical for regulating epithelial cell numbers, as extrusion signaling is misregulated in some of the most aggressive carcinomas and barrier function diseases. Additionally, her lab is finding that in addition to mechanical crowding causing cell death via extrusion, cell stretch causes cells to rapidly divide. Remarkably, the stretch-activated channel, Piezo-1, controls both crowding-induced extrusion and stretch-induced division in order to maintain constant epithelial cell numbers.

Seminar Topic

Epithelial cell turnover-new roles for mechanical tension driving cell death and division

Epithelial cells must maintain constant numbers to function as a barrier for the organs and organisms they coat. When they become too crowded, some cells are triggered to extrude and later die through activation of the stretch-activated channel, Piezo-1. Yet, when epithelial cells become too sparse to maintain a barrier, how is cell division triggered? Here, we show that mechanical stretch rapidly triggers epithelial cells to enter mitosis via the same Piezo-1 channel. Loss or inactivation of Piezo-1 prevents mitosis in response to mechanical stretch or wound healing. Piezo-1 controls progression into G2, as monolayers lacking it do not proliferate or accumulate cytoplasmic cyclin B following stretch. Unlike wild type monolayers Piezo-1 knockdown monolayers continue to migrate after closing a wound, suggesting Piezo-1 could link both control of cell proliferation and migration. Mechanical stretch only activates proliferation once epithelial cells reach homeostatic densities. Piezo-1 shifts from the nucleus in subconfluent epithelia to the plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum, sites where it could relay calcium currents, in confluent monolayers, suggesting a mechanism for how it may control stretch-induced proliferation upon reaching homeostasis. Our work suggests a new role for Piezo-1 controlling epithelial cell number homeostasis by mechanical stretch if cells become too sparse. Because Piezo-1 senses both mechanical crowding and stretch, it may act as a rheostat to control epithelial cell numbers by driving extrusion and apoptosis upon compression and cell division upon stretch.
 

Research lab


http://healthcare.utah.edu/huntsmancancerinstitute/research/labs/rosenblatt/

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Bill Hait (Janssen Research and Development) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/402-hait http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/402-hait Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: CSO Seminar Series
Date: Mon, Feb 23, 2015 - Mon, Feb 23, 2015
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Molecular Biology Chief Scientific Officer Seminar Series
presents the G. S. Beckwith Gilbert ’63 Lecture

Speaker
Bill Hait
William N. Hait, M.D., Ph.D.
Global Head, Research & Development

Janssen, Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson



Dr. William N. Hait is Global Head, Janssen Research & Development, LLC, the global research and development arm of Janssen, the pharmaceutical companies of Johnson & Johnson.  In this role, he leads the global R&D group in its mission to discover and develop innovative new medicines to address the world’s most serious unmet medical needs.

Dr. Hait joined Johnson & Johnson in 2007 and assumed the role of Global Therapy Area Head, Oncology, in 2009. 

Before that he was the founding Director of The (Rutgers) Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which he led to receive the National Cancer Institute’s highest designation of Comprehensive Cancer Center in 2002.  From 1993 to 2007 he was Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology and Associate Dean for Oncology Programs at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey -- Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

After earning his B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Hait received his M.D. and Ph.D. (Pharmacology) cum laude from the Medical College of Pennsylvania, where he was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha.  He joined the Yale University School of Medicine faculty in 1984 and became Associate Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology, Chief of the Division of Medical Oncology, Associate Director of the Yale University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Director of the Breast Cancer Unit and Co-Director of the Lung Cancer Unit.  Dr. Hait is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology.

Dr. Hait devoted his time to numerous advisory and editorial boards.  He was Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Cancer Research and Associate Editor of Cancer Research, served as President of the American Association for Cancer Research from 2007 – 2008 and currently serves as Treasurer.  He sits on various committees for the American Association of Cancer Research (Chair, Clinical Cancer Research Committee), the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the Association of American Cancer Institutes (Board of Directors), the National Cancer Institute Board of Scientific Advisors and is Chairman of the Executive Management Committee of Stand Up to Cancer.  He currently is a member of the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Director's Advisory Board, Board of External Advisors for the Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, the Stand Up to Cancer Scientific Advisory Board, The Board of Directors of Research America! and the Vanderbilt University Biomedical Science Advisory Board.

Dr. Hait has received numerous awards and honors including the Burroughs Wellcome Award in Clinical Pharmacology, election to the American Society of Clinical Investigation, and in 2013 he was elected as a Fellow of the AACR Academy. 

Seminar Topic

A Walk on the Wild Side

Career Opportunities in the Pharmaceutical Industry

William N. Hait, Janssen, the Pharmaceutical companies of Johnson and Johnson

Few students consider a career in the pharmaceutical industry. Rather, their role models have been professors enjoying a productive life in academia.  However, industry offers scientists and physicians broad and rewarding opportunities that should be considered when embarking on life’s journey.

The drug development process begins with a bright idea that leads to a discovery and the appreciation that the application of this discovery might bring benefits to large numbers of patients.  The key to the process is translational research or the application of a discovery to the practice of medicine.

In this presentation Dr. Hait reviews the process of drug development and the role that different scientific expertise plays in drug development. 

Finally, Dr. Hait will compare and contrast careers in academia versus ones in industry from the perspective of an individual who has done both.

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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CSO Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Oliver Hobert (Columbia) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/365-hobert http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/365-hobert Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Feb 18, 2015 - Wed, Feb 18, 2015
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
Oliver
Oliver Hobert, Ph.D.
Columbia University Medical Center

Oliver Hobert is professor of biochemistry and molecular biophysics at Columbia University.  Dr. Hobert received his Ph.D. from Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry. The main focus of his laboratory is to understand the molecular mechanisms that generate the astounding diversity of cell types in a nervous system.

Seminar Topic

Hobert.Cover-art-3.NN2989-924x763
Map making in C. elegans: Charting the nervous system

The developmental history and anatomy of the nematode C.elegans has been exceptionally well mapped. The next frontier lies in taking maps to the next level, that of molecular maps which define the identity and function of unique cell types. Defining molecular maps is in particularly high demand in the context of the nervous system. For example, the C.elegans connectome, which still remains the only connectome of any nervous system, begs the question how neurons communicate with one another. I will describe our efforts to build a comprehensive neurotransmitter map of the C.elegans nervous system and I will then use this neurotransmitter map to describe our efforts to provide “regulatory maps” which explain how neurotransmitter identity is genetically programmed and how this critical identity feature of a neuron is linked to other identity features of a neuron. The underlying vision that guides our research is to understand on a true system-wide level how a nervous system is built.

Research lab

http://hobertlab.org

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Sreekanth Chalasani (UC, San Diego) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/364-chalasani http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/364-chalasani Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Feb 11, 2015 - Wed, Feb 11, 2015
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
chalasani
Sreekanth Chalasani, Ph.D.
University of California, San Diego
Salk Institute for Biological Studies 

Dr. Sreekanth Chalasani is Assistant Professor of Molecular Neurobiology at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, University of California, San Diego.  Dr. Chalasani received his B.S. from Osmania University, India and his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.   His lab's research focuses on how neural circuits decode environmental changes and drive behaviors. The lab uses the nematode, C. elegans and zebrafish as models to study brain functions.

Seminar Topic

 
Smells..turns..and worms.. dissecting C. elegans neural circuits
 

Research lab


http://www.salk.edu/labs/chalasani

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Joseph Mougous (U Washington) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/363-mougous http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/363-mougous Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Feb 04, 2015 - Wed, Feb 04, 2015
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
joseph mougous
Joseph Mougous, Ph.D.
University of Washington

Joseph received his undergraduate degree at Western Washington University, Bellingham, where he studied surface chemistry. He then earned his Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley, where he worked in Carolyn Bertozzi’s laboratory studying sulfated glycolipids of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. After completing his graduate studies, Joseph joined the laboratory of John Mekalanos at Harvard Medical School, where he characterized a type VI secretion system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Joseph established his laboratory at the University of Washington in 2008.

Seminar Topic

 
New insights into toxins and pathways mediating interbacterial interactions

Though they are by definition single-celled organisms, bacteria can exhibit properties more often ascribed to multicellular life. Our group aims to identify, characterize, and eventually, exploit, pathways that bacteria use for intercellular communication and competition. In this presentation, I will discuss our recent progress toward understanding the diversity of mechanisms by which antibacterial toxins delivered by the type VI secretion system act upon recipient cells. I will also describe our discovery that a conserved signaling pathway allows cells of the Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa to mount a coordinated response to antagonism by competing bacteria.
 

Research lab


http://faculty.washington.edu/mougous

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Melissa Moore (HHMI/UMass Medical School) **CANCELED** http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/362-moore http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/362-moore Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Jan 28, 2015 - Wed, Jan 28, 2015
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THIS EVENT IS CANCELED.

Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
Melissa Moore
Melissa J. Moore, Ph.D.
Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Co-director, RNA Therapeutics Institute
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Dr. Moore is the Eleanor Eustis Farrington Chair in Cancer Research, Professor in Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology and Co-director of the UMMS RNA Therapeutics Institutes. She has been a HHMI Investigator since 1997.

The Moore lab is interested in pre-mRNA splicing and its connections to intracellular mRNA localization, translation, and degradation. Encompassing a broad array of topics involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation in eukaryotes via mechanisms involving RNA, Dr. Moore's work on fundamental mechanisms of gene expression touches on many human diseases including cancer and neurodegeneration.

She received her B.S. degree in chemistry and biology from the College of William and Mary and her Ph.D. degree in biological chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She began working on RNA metabolism during her postdoctoral training with Phillip Sharp at MIT. Dr. Moore's honors include the Searle Scholars Award, a David and Lucile Packard fellowship, and the ASBMB William C. Rose Award.

Seminar Topic

 
Assembly and Dynamics of Uber Complex RNPs

Research lab


http://labs.umassmed.edu/moorelab/Moore_Lab_Website/home.html

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Rachel Patton McCord (U Mass, School of Medicine) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/415-mccord http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/415-mccord Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Special Seminar
Date: Tue, Jan 27, 2015 - Tue, Jan 27, 2015
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SPECIAL SEMINAR

Speaker
 rachel
Rachel Patton McCord, Ph.D.
University of Massachusetts, School of Medicine

Seminar Topic

RPMJobTalkImage2

The 3D Genome: Folding, Misfolding, and Unfolding

How is a 2 meter-long genome folded into a microscopic nucleus? Genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) experiments and computational analyses of the resulting data reveal hierarchical layers of 3D genome folding from whole chromosome territories to active and inactive gene compartmentalization.  I will discuss my investigations into how these different structural levels relate to biological function: linking genome folding and sites of cancer-related translocations in B cells, characterizing the genome misfolding that occurs in the premature aging disease Progeria, and discovering that a key protein mutant causes unfolding of the dosage compensated X chromosome in C. elegans. Conclusions from these studies inform my future plans to measure the effects of physical force on 3D genome structure as a way to characterize its physical properties, key components, and biological importance.

Research lab

TBA

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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Special Seminar Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Mansun Law (Scripps) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/361-law http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/361-law Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Jan 21, 2015 - Wed, Jan 21, 2015
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Bulter Seminar Series

Speaker
law
Mansun Law, Ph.D.
The Scripps Research Institute

Dr. Mansun Law is Associate Professor of Immunology and Microbial Science at The Scripps Research Institute. He received his Ph.D. in Virology from the University of Oxford in 2001.  His lab's research focuses on challenges in understanding and generating protective antibodies to highly variable human viruses.

Seminar Topic

 
Hepatitis C virus neutralizing epitopes and rational vaccine design

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects >130 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and the need of liver transplantation in developed countries. Due to the extreme genetic diversity of HCV, it has been technically challenging to develop a vaccine that will be broadly effective against the majority of circulating virus genotypes. The HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2, the targets of neutralizing antibodies, are antigenically variable and contain structural features to evade host immune responses. In the past 7 years, the field has taken a rational approach to systematically dissect the antigenic surface of the glycoproteins in order to identify antigenic sites that may mediate cross-protection against diverse HCV genotypes. An antigenic region (AR) on E2, which we termed AR3, was found to be conserved and also immunogenic in infection and immunization. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to AR3 can block E2 binding to the cellular receptor CD81, neutralize diverse HCV isolates in vitro, and protect the human liver-chimeric mouse model from infection by HCV quasispecies. To better define AR3, E2 was engineered to the core domain, E2c, which maintains the overall protein fold and the function in receptor binding. E2c was successfully co-crystallized with mAb AR3C for structure determination, revealing a protein fold distinct from the envelope proteins of related flaviviruses. The structure defines the protein regions required for virus neutralization and provides a template for rational immunogen design to focus neutralizing antibody responses to AR3.
 

Research lab


http://www.scripps.edu/law

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Randal Halfmann (UT Southwestern Medical Center) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/414-halfmann http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/414-halfmann Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Special Seminar
Date: Mon, Jan 19, 2015 - Mon, Jan 19, 2015
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SPECIAL SEMINAR

Speaker
 randal halfmann
Randal Halfmann, Ph.D.
Department of Biochemistry, UT Southwestern Medical Center

Seminar Topic

The Social Lives of Prions

The replication of biological information is no longer the exclusive purview of nucleic acids. Information can also be encoded and replicated solely through the self-templated assembly of certain proteins known as prions. My lab seeks to explore the breadth of biological effects mediated by prion-like self assembly and to decipher the rules that govern it. Our findings establish a general role for prion formation in cell fate determination. First, we have discovered that prions in budding yeast act as environmentally-responsive determinants of multicellularity and drive primitive metabolic divisions of labor. Second, we have discovered a new class of prions, in mammals, that functionally commit cells to antiviral and inflammatory responses. Finally, we have developed a powerful new method that enables high throughput detection and quantification of prion-like self assembly, which will dramatically accelerate future such discoveries.

Research lab

 http://www.utsouthwestern.edu/labs/halfmann/

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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Special Seminar Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Franziska Michor (Harvard) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/413-franziska-michor-harvard http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/413-franziska-michor-harvard Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Special Seminar
Date: Wed, Jan 14, 2015 - Wed, Jan 14, 2015
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Speaker
Franziska
Franziska Michor, Ph.D.
Harvard University

Dr. Michor is an Associate Professor of Computational Biology in the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and in the Department of Biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health.  Dr. Michor obtained her undergraduate training in mathematics and molecular biology from the University of Vienna, Austria, and her PhD from the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University.  Afterwards, she was awarded a fellowship from the Harvard Society of Fellows.  From 2007 until 2010, she was an Assistant Professor in the Computational Biology Program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.  Dr. Michor is the director of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Physical Sciences-Oncology Center and has been the recipient of the Theodosius Dobzhansky Prize of the Society for the Study of Evolution, the Gerstner Young Investigator Award, Leon Levy Young Investigator Award, and the Alice Hamilton Award from Harvard University.  Dr. Michor's laboratory investigates the evolutionary dynamics of cancer initiation, progression, response to therapy, and emergence of resistance.
Seminar Topic

Systems Biology of Cancer

Research lab

 

http://michorlab.dfci.harvard.edu/index.php/people/franziska-michor

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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Special Seminar Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Mindfulness of Health and Happiness http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/406-mindfulness-of-health-and-happiness http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/406-mindfulness-of-health-and-happiness Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 118 - Princeton
Category: Mindfulness Workshop
Date: Fri, Jan 09, 2015 - Fri, Jan 09, 2015
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For Faculty and Staff

Mindfulness of Health and Happiness: Research shows that health and happiness go together, and that good health is dependent upon exercise, nutrition, sleep, and a regular dose of positive emotions. Happier people experience less stress and have stronger immune systems. Through the practice of mindfulness, we can learn simple and practical steps to improve our own health. By cultivating positive emotions, we are taking care of our bodies and our minds.

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Mindfulness Workshop Thu, 18 Dec 2014 14:07:07 -0500