Princeton University Molecular Biology - Archived Events http://molbio.princeton.edu Wed, 23 Apr 2014 19:42:08 -0400 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Steven Salzberg (Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/344-steven-salzberg http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/344-steven-salzberg Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Special Seminar
Date: Tue, Apr 15, 2014 - Tue, Apr 15, 2014
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Speaker

steven salzbergSteven Salzberg
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Steven Salzberg is Professor of Medicine, Biostatistics, and Computer Science at the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, where he is also Director of the Center for Computational Biology. His group's research focuses on the development of new computational methods for analysis of DNA from the latest sequencing technologies. Over the years they have developed and applied software to many problems in gene finding, genome assembly, comparative genomics, evolutionary genomics, and sequencing technology itself.

Professor Salzberg's current work emphasizes analysis of DNA and RNA sequenced with next-generation technology. His blogs and other writing cover topics on the impact of science on society including the effects of pseudoscience, the problems of alternative medicine, the anti-vaccination movement, gene patents, and the influence of sports on higher education. See the links on his lab home page for his scientific publications, his opinion pieces, and other news.

Seminar Topic

Computational Challenges of High Throughput Genome Sequence Analysis

Next-generation sequencing technology allows us to peer inside the cell in exquisite detail, revealing new insights into biology, evolution, and disease that would have been impossible to discover just a few years ago. The enormous volumes of data produced by NGS experiments present many computational challenges that we are working to address. In this talk, I will discuss some of our algorithmic solutions to two key alignment problems: (1) mapping sequences onto the human genome at very high speed, and (2) mapping and assembling transcripts from RNA-seq experiments. I will also discuss some of the problems that can arise during analysis of exome data, in which the gene-containing portions of the genome are sequenced in an effort to identify mutations responsible for disease. My group has developed algorithms to solve each of these problems, including the widely-used Bowtie program for fast DNA sequence alignment, the TopHat and Cufflinks programs for assembly of genes from transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) experiments, and the new DIAMUND program for detecting de novo mutations. This talk describes joint work with current and former lab members including Ben Langmead, Cole Trapnell, Daehwan Kim, Mihaela Pertea, and Geo Pertea.

Research Lab

http://ccb.jhu.edu/people/salzberg/Salzberg/Salzberg_Lab_Home.html

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Special Seminar Fri, 14 Mar 2014 16:34:49 -0400
Trisha Davis (University of Washington) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/275-Davis http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/275-Davis Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Apr 02, 2014 - Wed, Apr 02, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Trisha DavisTrisha N. Davis
University of Washington

Dr. Davis received her BA from UCSC in Computer Science and Biology and her PhD from Yale University.  Her thesis work, performed in the laboratory of Dr. John Cronan, concerned the assembly of a bacteriophage with an inner membrane.  During her postdoctoral fellowship in Dr. Jeremy Thorner’s lab, she studied calcium signalling.  She has been a professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Washington for 26 years and was recently appointed the Earl W. Davie/Zymogenetics Endowed Chair of Biochemistry.  Dr. Davis studies how cells assemble and regulate the machinery required for accurate chromosome segregation.  She is also the director of a multidisciplinary technology development research center.

Seminar Topic

Chromosome Segregation by the Mitotic Spindle: Investigations at the Intersection of Molecular Cell Biology, Biochemistry and Structural Biology

How does the cell ensure transmission of an exact complement of chromosomes each cell division? How does this process go awry in cancer cells? These are questions of interest to our lab. We use a variety of techniques from single-molecule biophysical approaches to biochemistry, genetics and microscopy to explore the regulation and assembly of the machinery that ensures each daughter cell receives a full set of chromosomes every cell division. 

Chromosomes are segregated to daughter cells by a microtubule-based molecular machine, the mitotic spindle.  The spindle has two poles, each one carrying an exact complement of chromosomes to each daughter cell. Spindle morphogenesis requires spatially controlled microtubule nucleation.  The proteins required for nucleation are known, but they are surprisingly inactive in isolated form.  We are studying how these proteins are activated to nucleate microtubules during spindle formation and how their activation is regulated.


Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Krishna Shenoy (Stanford) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/303-Shenoy http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/303-Shenoy Location: Carl Icahn Lab, 101 - Princeton
Category: Quantitative & Computional Biology
Date: Mon, Mar 31, 2014 - Mon, Mar 31, 2014
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Quantitative & Computational Biology

Speaker

Krishna ShenoyKrishna Shenoy
Stanford University
 
Shenoy conducts basic and applied research on neural prosthetic systems. Basic studies include investigating sensory-motor and cognitive functions in the primate cortex using a combination of behavioral, electrophysiological, and computational techniques to discover how populations of neurons represent movement plans. Applied studies include designing algorithms to read out these representations and developing prosthetic systems controlled by the neural activity. The ultimate goal of these neural prosthetic systems, or brain-computer interfaces, is to assist disabled patients.

 

Seminar Topic

TBA

Research Lab

http://www.stanford.edu/~shenoy/

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Quantitative & Computional Biology Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Bruce R. Levin (Emory University) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/343-Levin http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/343-Levin Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Fri, Mar 28, 2014 - Fri, Mar 28, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

0123Bruce R. Levin
Emory University

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seminar Topic

The Population and Evolutionary Dynamics of Adaptive Immunity in Bacteria:  CRISPR and CAS are Not Just the Tools of Capitalist Molecular Biologists.

Arguable, surely to those who work on it, the demonstration that the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) regions and their associated sequences (Cas) that abound in the genomes of the majority of Archaea and nearly half the Bacteria can serve as an adaptive immune system has been the single most important new finding in Microbiology and Molecular Biology this millennium.   By incorporating 30 or so base pairs of the infecting DNA into regions between these palindromic repeats, when subsequently infected by DNA with sequences identical to that of the incorporated “spacers”, through a process mediated by small RNAs, CRISP-Cas encoding bacteria and archaea abort the infection.   When these infectious DNAs are those of necessarily lethal (lytic) bacterial viruses the advantages of CRISPR-Cas mediated immunity are straightforward and easily demonstrated experimentally as well as theoretical, albeit more kinky than anticipated.  But not all infectious DNAs are deleterious; some like plasmids and temperate bacteriophages may bear genes, such as those conferring resistance that in the presence of antibiotics that can be very much to the advantage of recipient bacteria.  In this talk I will present the results of the mathematical and computer simulation modeling and population and evolutionary dynamic and experiments we have been doing to explore the upside of CRISPR-Cas immunity, protection against infections against lethal infections with lytic and temperate phage, and the downside of this immune system, preventing the acquisition of plasmids and temperate phage bearing beneficial genes.   I will consider the nature of and factors limiting the CRISPR-Cas mediated Lamarckian - Darwinian arms races between bacteria and phage, and present a hypothesis to account for the extraordinary diversity in the existence, number and function of CRISPR-Cas systems within and between species of bacteria and archaea.

 

Research Lab

 http://www.eclf.net/

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Massimo Lopes (University of Zurich) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/281-Lopes http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/281-Lopes Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Mar 26, 2014 - Wed, Mar 26, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Web - No PhotoMassimo Lopes
University of Zurich

 

 

 

 

Seminar Topic

 

 

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
David Tuveson (Cold Spring Harbor) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/284-Tuveson http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/284-Tuveson Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Mar 26, 2014 - Wed, Mar 26, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

David TuvesonDavid Tuveson
Cold Spring Harbor

David Tuveson MD, PhD, is Professor and the Deputy Director of the Cancer Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Dr. Tuveson is also the Director of Research for the Lustgarten Pancreatic Cancer Research Foundation, and cares for pancreatic cancer patients at MSKCC. Dr. Tuveson received his medical and graduate training at Johns Hopkins, followed by clinical training at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. While at Dana-Farber, Dr. Tuveson co-developed Imatinib with Dr. Demetri for GIST patients.  Following post-doctoral training with Tyler Jacks at MIT, Dr. Tuveson directed laboratories at the University of Pennsylvania and Cambridge University prior to moving to Cold Spring Harbor in 2012. Dr. Tuveson’s laboratory established mouse models of pancreatic cancer to explore the biology of the disease and identify new therapeutic and diagnostic approaches. At CSHL he leads the Cancer Therapeutics Initiative.

 

Seminar Topic

Progress in Pancreatic Cancer Modeling

Although ductal pancreatic cancer remains highly lethal, recent laboratory progress in demystifying this disease have provided several new therapeutic approaches. Somatically mutant KRAS is present in most cases of pancreatic cancer, and mouse models have clarified the role of oncogenic Kras in neoplastic initiation and progression. Surprisingly, methods that target canonical MAPK/PI3K effector pathways have been only partially successful in mouse models. 

Therefore, we have investigated additional aspects of pancreatic tumor biology that contribute to disease pathogenesis. Chief contributors to the unusual desmoplastic structure and drug-refractory nature of pancreatic tumors are activated pancreatic stellate cells. PSCs assume a fibroblastic morphology and function during tumor evolution, resulting in a collagen- and glycosaminoglycan-rich extracellular matrix that prevents angiogenesis and compresses the resident vasculature such that drug delivery is impeded.  Additionally, PSCs secrete many products including CTGF that promote neoplastic cell survival and thereby suppress therapeutic responses to classical and targeted agents. Finally, PSCs secrete CxCl12, which repels T lymphocytes from neoplastic cells to prevent immune clearance. Despite the existence of these biophysical, biochemical and immune therapeutic resistance mechanisms, they also provide avenues to circumvent each barrier for improved outcomes.

 

Research Lab

www.cshl.edu/Faculty/david-tuveson

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Joshua Rabinowitz (Princeton University) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/342-joshua-rabinowitz http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/342-joshua-rabinowitz Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Special Seminar
Date: Fri, Mar 14, 2014 - Fri, Mar 14, 2014
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Special Seminar Mon, 10 Mar 2014 11:25:07 -0400
Lisa A. Taneyhill http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/331-Taneyhill http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/331-Taneyhill Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Colloquium
Date: Fri, Mar 14, 2014 - Fri, Mar 14, 2014
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Developmental Biology Colloquia

Speaker

Web - No PhotoLisa A. Taneyhill
University of Maryland

 

 

 

 

Seminar Topic

 

 

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Developmental Colloquium Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Suzanne Paradis (Brandeis University) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/286-Paradis http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/286-Paradis Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Mar 12, 2014 - Wed, Mar 12, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Suzanne ParadisSuzanne Paradis
Brandeis University

Dr. Paradis received her BA from Cornell University and her PhD in Genetics from Harvard Medical School. Her thesis research, performed in the laboratory of Dr. Gary Ruvkun, investigated the genetic program that regulates lifespan in the nematode C. elegans. During her postdoctoral fellowship in the lab of Dr. Michael Greenberg at Harvard Medical School, she pioneered the use of RNAi in cultured hippocampal neurons to identify new molecules required for synapse formation. Her own lab at Brandeis University focuses on how intact circuits form in the mammalian CNS by  defining the genes that instruct neurons to modify their synaptic connections and dendritic morphology in response to changes in sensory experience.

 

Seminar Topic

Signaling Pathways that Instruct Rapid Changes in Neuronal Connectivity

The overall structure and function of circuits in the central nervous system is established by a variety of carefully orchestrated processes, including the formation of synapses and the morphogenesis of the dendritic arbor of individual neurons. Further, while it is well-established that sensory experience sculpts connections in the nervous system, it is not at all understood how this is accomplished at the molecular level. My lab focuses on identifying and defining the function of genes that regulate neuronal connectivity and structural plasticity both in the context of changes in sensory experience and nervous system development. We recently discovered that the activity-dependent expression of the GTPase Rem2 functions as a critical regulator of activity-dependent dendritic branching, as dialing Rem2 expression up or down in the context of increased sensory experience in an intact circuit decreases or increases dendritic branching accordingly. Overall, our studies of Rem2 reveal a previously unappreciated signaling paradigm whereby increased neuronal activity simultaneously initiates signal transduction networks that either promote or restrict dendritic arborization. In addition, our studies of synapse formation revealed that treatment of cultured neurons with the extracellular domain of the protein Sema4D causes a rapid increase (i.e. within 2 hours) in the density of functional GABAergic synapses. Using an organotypic hippocampal slice culture as an in vitro model of epileptiform activity, we demonstrated that acute Sema4D treatment rapidly and dramatically alters the hyperexcitability found in these slices in a manner consistent with a Sema4D-mediated increase in network inhibition. Our studies suggest the tantalizing possibility that Sema4D, as well as other molecules that instruct formation of GABAergic synapses, could be used as a disease-modifying treatment for epilepsy.

Research Lab

www.bio.brandeis.edu/paradislab/suzanne_paradis.html 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Paul Sternberg (Caltech) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/302-Sternberg http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/302-Sternberg Location: Carl Icahn Lab, 101 - Princeton
Category: Quantitative & Computional Biology
Date: Mon, Mar 10, 2014 - Mon, Mar 10, 2014
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Quantitative & Computational Biology

Speaker

Paul SternbergPaul Sternberg
California Institute of Technology
 

Using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, our laboratory takes a molecular genetic approach to basic questions in biology:

How are the properties of an organism -its development, physiology and behavior- encoded in its genome?  How are signals among cells integrated to coordinate organ formation?  How do genes control the ability to execute stereotyped behavior?  How does behavior evolve?  What changes in the nervous system occur during sleep?  How do cells migrate accurately?

Our major strategy is to perturb the activity of one or more genes and measure how cells or animals misbehave to infer gene function and genetic pathways. We measure gene expression by RNA-seq and transgenic reporters; we measure behavior using automated systems and optogenetics. We focus on intercellular signals and their transduction by the responding cell into transcriptional outputs. Many of the genes we have identified are the nematode counterparts of human genes, and we expect that some of our findings will apply to human genes as well. Nematodes are major health and agricultural problems, so we focus on parasite relevant biology such as dauer/infective juvenile development, using genomics and molecular genetics.

 

Seminar Topic

TBA

Research Lab

http://wormlab.caltech.edu/

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Quantitative & Computional Biology Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Jodi Schottenfeld http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/330-Schottenfeld http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/330-Schottenfeld Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Colloquium
Date: Fri, Mar 07, 2014 - Fri, Mar 07, 2014
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Developmental Biology Colloquia

Speaker

Web - No PhotoJodi Schottenfeld
University of Pennsylvania

 

 

 

 

Seminar Topic

 

 

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Developmental Colloquium Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Karine Gibbs (Harvard University) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/276-Gibbs http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/276-Gibbs Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Mar 05, 2014 - Wed, Mar 05, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Kathrine GibbsKarine Gibbs
Harvard university

Karine Gibbs is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard University. Her research group endeavors to discern the fundamental mechanisms by which cells and organisms distinguish genetic ‘self’ from ‘non-self’. They leverage the physiological simplicity and experimental tractability of a bacterium that combines a concept of self with sensing, signaling, and movement to produce sophisticated social behaviors.

Recently, Karine received a David and Lucile Packard Foundation Fellowship for Science and Engineering and a George W. Merck Fellowship. She graduated with an A.B. in Biochemical Sciences from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in Microbiology and Immunology at Stanford University. As a graduate student with Dr. Julie Theriot, she studied the cell biology of pathogens and developed tools to follow the movements of proteins on the bacterial surface. She was a Stanford Graduate Fellow, a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, and an ASM Robert D. Watkins Minority Graduate Research Fellow. Upon defending her graduate thesis, she received the Professor Sidney Raffel Award at Stanford in recognition of outstanding academic achievement in graduate studies in Microbiology and Immunology. She studied with Dr. E. Peter Greenberg for her postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Washington, where she received a University of Washington Bacterial Pathogenesis Training Grant Postdoctoral Trainee award. In Dr. Greenberg’s research group, she began her investigations of the molecular mechanisms underlying self-recognition in bacteria.

 

Seminar Topic

Self Versus Nonself Recognition: How a Bacterium Uses a Two-Protein Handshake to Define Identity

The ability to distinguish self from foreign, found broadly in biology, is required for many group behaviors, such as territoriality and immune recognition. At its foundation, self-recognition depends on a cell’s ability to define and communicate its (self) identity. In eukaryotes, the communication of self-identity can be complex, employing cell-specific complexes. For the bacterium Proteus mirabilis, self versus nonself-recognition is exhibited through the physical exclusion of one strain from surfaces occupied by another. This self-recognition behavior is driven by two independent multi-protein systems that intersect due to dependence on a type VI secretion system. We have recently shown that two of these self-recognition proteins bind to each other and that this interaction is chiefly limited to the variants originating from the same strain. The specificity of binding can be modulated through modifications to distinctive amino acid sequences found within a variable region of each protein. Interestingly, the in vitro binding specificity correlates with strain-specific identity in vivo. Our data support a model in which a strain-specific, two-protein complex is sufficient to define identity and mediate social behaviors dependent on self-recognition.

 

Research Lab

www.gibbslab.org/

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Tanja Kortemme (UCSF) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/272-Kortemme http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/272-Kortemme Location: Carl Icahn Lab, 101 - Princeton
Category: Quantitative & Computional Biology
Date: Mon, Mar 03, 2014 - Mon, Mar 03, 2014
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Quantitative & Computational Biology

Speaker

Tanja KortemmeTanja Kortemme
University of California San Francisco
 
We are interested in how biological molecules communicate with each other, and how this communication encodes the processing of information. How do biomolecules recognize one another, and how do their interactions transduce signals? How do molecules build up "modules" that act as "adaptors", "switches" and feedback-loops? How are modules wired together into the networks responsible for regulation and decision processes observed in biology?

Computationally, we have developed a simple physical energy function for the prediction and design of protein-protein interactions, at the atomic level. Experimentally, we have applied this model to the computational redesign of a protein interface and have created an artificial DNA binding protein with new specificity. More recently, we have developed a computational strategy for the redesign of protein complexes to generate new pairs of interacting proteins.

We are now applying and extending our computational model at different "resolution", ranging from details of atom-atom interactions to cellular communication networks. We are aiming to develop more accurate methods to model the structural details of molecular interactions. Can new interactions and modules with defined properties be engineered? Ultimately we would like to apply computational and experimental methods to better understand how cellular processes are regulated by molecular communication.

Seminar Topic

TBA


Research Lab

http://kortemmelab.ucsf.edu/index.html

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Quantitative & Computional Biology Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Joshua W. Shaevitz http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/329-Shaevitz http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/329-Shaevitz Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Colloquium
Date: Fri, Feb 28, 2014 - Fri, Feb 28, 2014
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Developmental Biology Colloquia

Speaker

Web - No PhotoJoshua W. Shaevitz
princeton University

 

 

 

 

Seminar Topic

 

 

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Developmental Colloquium Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Kenneth R. Miller (Brown) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/341-Miller http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/341-Miller Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Thu, Feb 27, 2014 - Thu, Feb 27, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Ken MillerKenneth R. Miller
Brown University

Ken Miller is Professor of Biology at Brown University. He serves as life science advisor to the NewsHour on PBS and is coauthor, with Joseph S. Levine, of high school textbooks used by millions of students. In 2005 he served as lead witness in the trial on evolution and intelligent design in Dover, Pennsylvania. His popular books include, Finding Darwin's God: A Scientist's Search for Common Ground between God and Evolution, and Only a Theory: Evolution and the Battle for America's Soul. His honors include the Public Service Award of the American Society for Cell Biology (2006), the Public Understanding of Science Award from AAAS (2009), and the Stephen Jay Gould Prize (2011).

 

Seminar Topic

The Evolution Wars. Why do they Continue? Why do they Matter?

Close to 90 years after the Scopes "Monkey Trial," evolution remains a contentious issue in the United States. Presidential candidates denounce it, governors insist that schools teach "alternate theories," and acceptance of evolution among members of the general public is lower in the US than in any other industrialized country. What's the reason for this, and what does it say about the future of the American scientific enterprise?

Research Lab

https://research.brown.edu/myresearch/Kenneth_Raymond_Miller

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Judith Kimble (University of Wisconsin - Madison) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/287-Kimble http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/287-Kimble Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Feb 26, 2014 - Wed, Feb 26, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Judith KimbleJudith Kimble
University of Wisconsin - Madison

Judith Kimble is a Vilas Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and an Investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. She received her B.A. at University of California-Berkeley, her Ph. D. from University of Colorado-Boulder and did her postdoctoral training at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England. She joined the faculty of the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1983, and has been there since. Kimble is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. 

 

Seminar Topic

 A Model Stem Cell Niche and Its Control of Germline Self-Renewal and Differentiation

 

Research Lab

My laboratory focuses on the in vivo regulation of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in the germline tissue of the small nematode C. elegans. In this tissue, Notch signaling from a single-celled mesenchymal niche promotes maintenance of germline stem cells (GSCs) and an RNA regulatory network drives the choice between self-renewal and differentiation. My talk will focus on two broadly important questions. One is how niche signaling regulates stem cells — what are the downstream effectors? The second is how the sperm/oocyte decision is regulated. In the first half of my talk, I will describe our recent discovery of the key effectors of Notch signaling for GSC maintenance. In the second half, I will describe our use of classical genetics, molecular biology, genomics and chemical reprogramming to tackle the elusive sperm/oocyte decision, highlighting its remarkably plasticity, even in adults.

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Jack Lee http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/328-Lee http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/328-Lee Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Colloquium
Date: Fri, Feb 21, 2014 - Fri, Feb 21, 2014
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Developmental Biology Colloquia

Speaker

Web - No PhotoJack Lee
princeton University

 

 

 

 

Seminar Topic

 

 

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Developmental Colloquium Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Matthew B. Neiditch (Rutgers University) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/277-Neiditch http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/277-Neiditch Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Feb 19, 2014 - Wed, Feb 19, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Matthew NeiditchMatthew B. Neiditch
Rutgers university

Dr. Matthew Neiditch is an Associate Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics at Rutgers - New Jersey Medical School. Dr. Neiditch received his B.S. at Rutgers where his earliest research employed analytical techniques to study chemical properties of non-nutritive sweeteners. He received his Ph.D. at Baylor College of Medicine where he studied the molecular mechanism of VDJ recombination in the laboratory of Dr. David Roth in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Dr. Neiditch was a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Frederick Hughson in the Department of Molecular Biology at Princeton University. Here, Dr. Neiditch carried out studies of bacterial cell-cell communication, which continues to be a primary area of research in his lab.

Dr. Neiditch’s group uses diverse methods including biochemical, genetic, computational, and biophysical (mainly X-ray crystallographic) techniques to study fundamentally important and broadly conserved cellular processes in bacteria. The basic science research in his lab encompasses structure-function studies of peptide-mediated bacterial cell-cell communication, c-di-GMP second messenger signal transduction, phosphorelay signal transduction, phosphatases, and transcriptional anti-activators, among others. The translational work in the Neiditch lab focuses on developing broad-spectrum inhibitors of bacterial biofilm growth and cell-cell communication as well as inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mycolic acid biosynthesis.

 

Seminar Topic

Structural Biology of Cell-Cell Communication in Gram-Positive Bacteria

Pheromone-mediated cell-cell communication enables bacterial communities to coordinate social behaviors including, among others: virulence factor expression, motility, biofilm development, bioluminescence, antibiotic production, sporulation, and genetic competence. Typically, acylated homoserine lactones are used as pheromones by Gram-negative bacteria, whereas peptides are used by Gram-positive bacteria. This seminar will focus on the diverse cellular functions of the Gram-positive peptide pheromone receptors and their regulation by peptide pheromones. The results of genetic, biochemical, computational modeling, and X-ray crystallographic studies will be presented. The function and regulation of the pheromone receptors will be described in atomic detail, and the effects of pheromone receptor activity on bacterial communities will be discussed.

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Terry Orr-Weaver (Whitehead Institute, MIT) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/288-Orr-Weaver http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/288-Orr-Weaver Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Feb 12, 2014 - Wed, Feb 12, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Terry Orr-WeaverTerry Orr-Weaver
Whitehead Institute, MIT

Terry L. Orr-Weaver is an American Cancer Society Research Professor in the Department of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research.  She obtained her BA degree in Chemistry, summa cum laude, from the University of California, San Diego, in 1977 and her PhD in the laboratory of Dr. Jack Szostak in Biological Chemistry from Harvard University in 1984.  Following postdoctoral training in developmental biology in Dr. Allan Spradling’s laboratory at the Department of Embryology of the Carnegie Institution of Washington in Baltimore, MD, she joined MIT as an Assistant Professor of Biology and an Associate Member of the Whitehead Institute in 1987.  Her research addresses regulation of cell division during development, and her laboratory has discovered crucial control proteins for chromosome segregation and DNA replication.  From 2004-2006 she was Vice-President, President, and Past-President of the Genetics Society of America.  She was Vice-Chair and Chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation from 2002-2006.  She was President of the National Drosophila Board of Directors 2009-2010 and served the board as Past President until 2013.  In addition, she is chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee of Children’s Hospital in Boston.  In 2006 she was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.  In 2010 she was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.  She received the FASEB Excellence in Science award in 2013.

 

Seminar Topic

Post-Transcriptional Regulation of the Oocyte-to-Embryo Transition

The transition from the differentiated oocyte to the totipotent embryo marks the onset of development.  This occurs in the absence of transcription, and thus must be regulated by post-transcriptional control mechanisms such as translation and protein turnover.  We are investigating the regulation of the oocyte-to-embryo transition in Drosophila, in which egg activation can be experimentally separated from fertilization and zygotic gene expression.  To define the developmental parameters of this transition as well as the cell cycle change from meiosis to mitosis, we combined genome-wide polysome profiling and ribosome footprinting to survey the translational status of thousands of mRNAs and integrated those results with quantitative mass spectrometry measurements of proteome remodeling.  Genome-wide translational analysis demonstrated extensive translational changes with hundreds of translationally inhibited or activated mRNAs.  Importantly, we show that PNG kinase, previously known to promote translation of Cyclin B and Smaug, acts as a major regulator of the oocyte-to-embryo transition by controlling the translational levels of at least 60% of translationally controlled mRNAs.  Integrating proteome- and translation-based approaches revealed that translational upregulation is largely responsible for protein increases, but that only a small fraction of the translationally upregulated mRNAs cause an increase in the abundance of the corresponding protein.  We demonstrate that protein degradation, regulated in part by a meiosis-specific form of the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC), is necessary for the change from meiosis in the oocyte to mitosis in the embryo.  One key target is the Polo kinase inhibitor Matrimony, whose levels must be reduced for proper embryogenesis.  The proteomics and translatome studies also indicate an unexpected compensatory dynamic between translation and protein turnover during the return to totipotency.

 

Research Lab

orr-weaverlab.wi.mit.edu

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Thomas O. Daniel (Celgene Corporation) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/278-Daniel http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/278-Daniel Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: CSO Seminar Series
Date: Mon, Feb 10, 2014 - Mon, Feb 10, 2014
Add Description:

Chief Scientific Officer Seminar Series

Sponsored by Office of Corporate Relations and Department of Molecular Biology

Speaker

Thomas O. DanielThomas O. Daniel, M.D.

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT
PRESIDENT OF RESEARCH AND EARLY DEVELOPMENT
CELGENE CORPORATION

Dr. Thomas O. Daniel, M.D., has been Executive Vice President, President - Research and Early Development of Celgene Corp., since February 15, 2012. He has been President, Research and Early Development since December 2006. Previously he served as the Chief Scientific Officer at Ambrx Inc., as Vice President, Research at Amgen Inc., and as Senior Vice President of Discovery Research at Immunex. Dr. Daniel currently serves as a member of the Biomedical Science Advisory Board of Vanderbilt University Medical Center. A nephrologist and former academic investigator, Dr. Daniel was previously the K.M. Hakim Professor of Medicine and Cell Biology at Vanderbilt University, and Director of the Vanderbilt Center for Vascular Biology. He formerly conducted research in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at UC San Francisco, earned an M.D. from the University of Texas, Southwestern, and completed medical residency at Massachusetts General Hospital.

 

Seminar Topic

Found in Translation: Paths from Leading Science to Transformative Medicines

 

CORPORATION

Celgene Corporation, headquartered in Summit, New Jersey, is an integrated global biopharmaceutical company engaged primarily in the discovery, development and commercialization of novel therapies for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases through gene and protein regulation.

For more information, please visit www.celgene.com.

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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CSO Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400