Princeton University Molecular Biology - Archived Events http://molbio.princeton.edu Sat, 25 Oct 2014 12:50:32 -0400 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Takaki Komiyama (UC, San Diego) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/376-komiyama http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/376-komiyama Location: PNI, Room A32 -
Category: Neuroscience Seminar Series
Date: Thu, Oct 23, 2014 - Thu, Oct 23, 2014
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Neuroscience Seminar Series

Speaker
takaki
Takaki Komiyama, Ph.D.
University of California, San Diego

Seminar Topic

 
TBA
 

faculty Profile


http://biology.ucsd.edu/research/faculty/tkomiyama

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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Neuroscience Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Natividad Ruiz (Ohio State) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/356-ruiz http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/356-ruiz Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Oct 22, 2014 - Wed, Oct 22, 2014
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
 Ruiz
Natividad Ruiz, Ph.D.
Ohio State University

Natividad Ruiz is Assistant Professor of Microbiology at Ohio State University.  Natividad received a B.A. from  University of Kansas and a Ph.D. from Washington University.  

Seminar Topic

Translocation of lipid-linked peptidoglycan precursors across membranes

The peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall is a glycopeptide matrix that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane of most bacteria, conferring cell shape and osmoprotection. Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli build their PG matrix in their periplasm using the membrane-anchored precursor known as lipid II, a disaccharide-pentapeptide linked to the polyisoprene lipid carrier undecaprenyl-pyrophosphate. The most poorly understood step in PG biogenesis is how lipid II is translocated across the cytoplasmic membrane after it is synthesized in the inner leaflet of this lipid bilayer. The identity of the essential flippase that translocates lipid II has been controversial for years, with the debate centered on MurJ and FtsW, two membrane proteins that are required for PG biogenesis. Using structure-function analyses, we have shown that MurJ is structurally similar to transporters of amphipathic molecules. These studies have also revealed that MurJ contains a hydrophilic central cavity within the membrane that is essential for function. Furthermore, we have developed the first in vivo assay for lipid II flippase activity and a chemical genetic strategy to rapidly and specifically block MurJ function.  By combining these two methods, we have demonstrated that MurJ is the lipid II flippase in E. coli.   

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Lori Passmore (MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/391-passmore http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/391-passmore Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Special Seminar
Date: Mon, Oct 20, 2014 - Mon, Oct 20, 2014
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Special Seminar

Speaker
Lori Passmore
Lori Passmore, Ph.D.
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology,
Cambridge

Lori Passmore is a Group Leader at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB) in Cambridge UK. She received her BSc in Biochemistry from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and her PhD from The Institute of Cancer Research in London UK where she worked with Prof David Barford. Lori was a Beit Postdoctoral Fellow in the lab of Venki Ramakrishnan at MRC LMB where she studied the structures of eukaryotic ribosomes. Lori started her own lab in 2009 and studies the molecular mechanisms of multi-protein complexes that regulate gene expression.

Seminar Topic

Structural insights into macromolecular machines that regulate mRNA polyA tails

Almost all eukaryotic mRNAs have a 3´ polyA tail that contributes to post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. PolyA tails influence both translation and mRNA stability. My laboratory studies the macromolecular protein complexes that control addition and removal of poly(A) tails. We use a hybrid approach combining structural (cryo-EM, x-ray crystallography, NMR), biochemical, biophysical and genetic techniques to gain insights into their molecular mechanisms. We recently purified and reconstituted the activity of the conserved eukaryotic Pan2–Pan3 deadenylation complex. I will discuss structural and mechanistic studies that have provided insights into the function of Pan2–Pan3, including mRNA recruitment. In addition, I will discuss recent advances in sample preparation for electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) that we are using to study these complexes.
 

Research lab


http://www2.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/groups/passmore/

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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Special Seminar Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Gary Laevsky (Confocal, Princeton) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/393-laevsky http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/393-laevsky Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 118 - Princeton
Category: Microscopy Journal Club
Date: Fri, Oct 17, 2014 - Fri, Oct 17, 2014
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Microscopy Journal Club

Speaker
 Gary
Gary Laevsky, Ph.D.
Princeton University
Department of Molecular Biology
Confocal Facility Manager
Seminar Topic

Untitled1

Airyscan - Revolutionize Your Confocal Imaging
A new Zeiss technology

 

With Airyscan you increase the resolution of your imaging up to 140 nm laterally and 400 nm axially, at 488 nm – without sacrificing sensitivity or speed.

lab

Confocal Microscopy Core Facility (Molecular Biology)

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Microscopy Journal Club Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Bing He (Wieschaus Lab) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/394-he http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/394-he Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Biology Colloquia
Date: Fri, Oct 17, 2014 - Fri, Oct 17, 2014
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Developmental Biology Colloquia

Speaker
Bing He 
Bing He, Ph.D.
Postdoc, Wieschaus Lab
Princeton University

Seminar Topic

The disrupted underground network: dunk stabilizes actomyosin network during Drosophila cleavage

 

Research lab


http://molbio.princeton.edu/labs/wieschaus

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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Developmental Biology Colloquia Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Chris Eliasmith (University of Waterloo) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/375-eliasmith http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/375-eliasmith Location: PNI, Room A32 -
Category: Neuroscience Seminar Series
Date: Thu, Oct 16, 2014 - Thu, Oct 16, 2014
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Neuroscience Seminar Series

Speaker
Chris Eliasmith
Chris Eliasmith, Ph.D.
Boston University

Seminar Topic

 
TBA
 

faculty Profile


https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-theoretical-neuroscience/people-profiles/chris-eliasmith

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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Neuroscience Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Paul Shao (EM, Princeton) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/390-shao http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/390-shao Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Electron Microscopy
Date: Thu, Oct 16, 2014 - Thu, Oct 16, 2014
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Electron Microscopy

Speaker
 paul-shao
Paul Shao, Ph.D.
Princeton University
Electron Microscopy Facility Manager

Dr. Paul Shao has been with Princeton University since September, 2013. His knowledge base is broad and spans traditional academic disciplines. He earned his bachelor in life sciences while minoring in chemistry and computer science at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, his Ph.D. in biophysics at Boston University School of Medicine and focused on geosciences and environmental engineering during his postdoctoral research at Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland. At Princeton University, his position is a split appointment between Molecular Biology and Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM). He manages the electron microscope core facility for Molecular Biology while simultaneously supporting imaging and analysis equipment for the Imaging and Analysis Center (IAC) in Materials Science (PRISM).

Seminar Topic

Imaging and Analysis at Princeton University: Methods in Electron Microscopy

Traditionally, electron microscopy has been used by two distinct fields. Material scientists used it to image and analyze their hard materials, utilizing scattered and diffracted electrons and generated X-rays as means of characterization. Biological scientists used it to image their soft materials, with advances in technology leading toward near-atomic level resolution 3D reconstructions of proteins and macromolecular complexes.

As the lines separating the disciplines begins to blur, so do the methods employed. In this one-hour presentation, current methodology applicable to soft materials will be discussed, emphasizing capabilities available at Princeton University regardless of department of origin. Potential cross-disciplinary techniques will be mentioned along with plans for future technologies.

lab

Electron Microscopy Core Facility (Molecular Biology)

Imaging and Analysis Center (PRISM)          

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Electron Microscopy Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Eric Greene (Columbia) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/382-greene http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/382-greene Location: Carl Icahn Lab, 101 - Princeton
Category: Quantitative & Computational Biology
Date: Mon, Oct 13, 2014 - Mon, Oct 13, 2014
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Visualizing protein-nucleic acid interactions at the single-molecule level with DNA curtains

http://www.princeton.edu/genomics/seminars/quantitative-computationa/viewevent.xml?id=235

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Quantitative & Computational Biology Thu, 25 Sep 2014 10:27:14 -0400
Howard Eichenbaum (Boston University) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/374-eichenbaum http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/374-eichenbaum Location: PNI, Room A32 -
Category: Neuroscience Seminar Series
Date: Thu, Oct 09, 2014 - Thu, Oct 09, 2014
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Neuroscience Seminar Series

Speaker
Howard Eichenbaum
Howard Eichenbaum, Ph.D.
Boston University

Seminar Topic

 
TBA
 

faculty Profile


http://www.bu.edu/psych/faculty/hbe/

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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Neuroscience Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Francis Cuss (Bristol-Myers Squibb) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/373-cuss http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/373-cuss Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: CSO Seminar Series
Date: Thu, Oct 09, 2014 - Thu, Oct 09, 2014
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Molecular Biology Chief Scientific Officer Seminar Series
presents the G. S. Beckwith Gilbert ’63 Lecture

Speaker
Francis Cuss
Francis Cuss
MB BChir, FRCP
Executive Vice President and
Chief Scientific Officer, R&D
Bristol-Myers Squibb


Francis Cuss has served as Chief Scientific Officer since July 2013, and has been a member of the company’s Senior Management Team since 2010.

Francis is a physician with a background in general and academic medicine and broad experience in both pharmaceutical research and development. He joined Bristol-Myers Squibb in 2003 as senior vice president, Drug Discovery, took over additional responsibility for the discovery and exploratory development of potential new medicines in May 2006, and for all Research functions in 2010.

Prior to joining the company, he spent 14 years at Schering-Plough and three years at Glaxo, where his career included leadership roles in discovery, clinical research and medical affairs in the U.S. and Europe. Prior to joining the pharmaceutical industry, Francis was a practicing physician with a specialization in pulmonary medicine. He has also held several academic appointments, most recently as adjunct associate professor at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, PA.

Francis received his medical training in the United Kingdom. He holds medical degrees from Cambridge University, U.K. and is a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Medicine. He has published numerous articles and book chapters on topics of medical interest.

Seminar Topic

 
Translational Medicine: “It’s all about the patient”

Throughout his career, Dr. Francis Cuss, Chief Scientific Officer at Bristol-Myers Squibb, has had the good fortune to pursue unique opportunities in academic research, clinical practice and ultimately pharmaceutical discovery and development.  As he shares his personal experiences, Dr. Cuss will articulate the critical  importance of a focus on the patient and of connecting laboratory research with patients through translational medicine -- truly bench to bedside medicine… and back -- to deliver transformational treatments to patients in need.  In that always complex and sometimes risky process, he has come to better understand the importance of embracing the tension in pursuing innovative ideas while staying grounded in reality – a concept he refers to as having one’s head in the clouds and feet on the ground.  Dr. Cuss will discuss how understanding and applying these approaches should lead to a challenging and rewarding (and never dull) career in medicine and in the context of the Pharmaceutical Industry facilitate the delivery of innovative medicines that can make a real difference in the lives of patients.

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public


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CSO Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Jeff Gore (MIT) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/355-gore http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/355-gore Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Oct 08, 2014 - Wed, Oct 08, 2014
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
 Jeff Gore
Jeff Gore, Ph.D.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Jeff Gore is Assistant Professor of Physics at MIT.  Jeff received a B.S. in Physics, Mathematics, Economics, and Electrical Engineering at MIT and a Ph.D. in physics at UC, Berkeley.  The Gore lab uses laboratory microbial ecosystems to test fundamental ideas in theoretical ecology, evolutionary dynamics, and systems biology.

Seminar Topic

Negative frequency-dependent interactions as drivers of phenotypic heterogeneity within populations  

A major challenge in evolution is to understand the origin of the remarkable diversity that is observed in natural populations. A potentially significant stabilizing force for diversity are negative frequency-dependent interactions, in which rare phenotypes have an advantage. In this talk I will describe experiments probing such interactions in antibiotic degradation in bacteria and sugar utilization in yeast. Antibiotic resistance is often conferred via an enzyme that degrades the antibiotic, yet this degradation may provide protection to sensitive cells that do not carry the resistance gene. We find coexistence of resistant and sensitive bacteria as well as survival of a mutualism in which two resistant strains together can survive a multi-drug environment. Our observation of coexistence in antibiotic resistance nicely mirrors our previous observation of coexistence between cooperation and cheating in the production of enzymes necessary for yeast to break down the sugar sucrose. These negative frequency-dependent interactions between strategies may also lead to the emergence of phenotypic heterogeneity in clonal populations; we find that this is precisely the evolutionary driver of the bimodal ON/OFF response of the galactose network when yeast are provided multiple sugars.

 

Laboratory

 

http://gorelab.homestead.com/

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Matt Weirauch (U of Cincinnati) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/381-weirauch http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/381-weirauch Location: Carl Icahn Lab, 101 - Princeton
Category: Quantitative & Computational Biology
Date: Mon, Oct 06, 2014 - Mon, Oct 06, 2014
Add Description:

Determination and Inference of Eukaryotic Transcription Factor Binding Specificities

http://www.princeton.edu/genomics/seminars/quantitative-computationa/viewevent.xml?id=233

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Quantitative & Computational Biology Thu, 25 Sep 2014 10:27:14 -0400
Andres Leschziner (Harvard) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/354-leschziner http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/354-leschziner Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Oct 01, 2014 - Wed, Oct 01, 2014
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
Leschziner
Andres Leschziner, Ph.D.
Harvard University

Dr. Leschziner is Associate Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard University. He received his B.Sc. degree in Biology from McGill University and his Ph.D. degree from the department of Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry at Yale University, where he worked in the laboratories of Nigel Grindley and Tom Steitz. He went to the University of California, Berkeley, as a Jane Coffin Childs Postdoctoral Fellow to work with Eva Nogales. In 2007 he joined the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at Harvard University. Dr. Leschziner’s work is focused on understanding how macromolecular machines couple energy, in the form of nucleotide hydrolysis, to large conformational changes, specifically in ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling complexes and the microtubule-based motor dynein. Dr. Leschziner’s work was recognized with an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship in 2009.

Seminar Topic

 

Macromolecular Machine Dynamics: an Electron Microscopy View

The cell interior is both highly structured and highly dynamic. Macromolecular machines mediate much of this dynamic behavior, coupling energy—nucleotide hydrolysis—to conformational changes. How this coupling takes place, particularly in large, multi-subunit macromolecular assemblies remains a mystery. We are using three-dimensional electron microscopy, an ideal technique to visualize these complexes, along with biochemistry, single-molecule techniques and in vivo studies, to understand the dynamic behavior of macromolecular assemblies at both the mechanistic and cell biological levels. My group focuses on two major areas—nucleosome remodeling and cytoskeletal transport.

Nucleosome remodeling involves the ATP-dependent, non-covalent modification of the structure of nucleosomes, the basic unit of packaging of genomic DNA in eukaryotes.  These alterations are catalyzed by large macromolecular machines and are essential to controlling DNA accessibility. We are interested in understanding how these large remodeling machines couple energy to the modification of nucleosome structure and how they give rise to the different remodeling products they can generate.

Movement of cargo (including proteins, mRNAs, and organelles) along cytoskeletal tracks is also an ATP-dependent process. These movements are powered by molecular motors and are essential for cell division, cell-cell communication, and cellular homeostasis. We are focused on understanding how dynein, the largest and most complex of these motors, moves along its microtubule track. We are also investigating how the motor properties of dynein are regulated.

 

Laboratory

 

http://labs.mcb.harvard.edu/leschziner/

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Samara Reck-Peterson (Harvard) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/353-reck-peterson http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/353-reck-peterson Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Tue, Sep 30, 2014 - Tue, Sep 30, 2014
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
Samara
Samara Reck-Peterson, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Dr. Reck-Peterson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School. She received her B.A. in Biology from Carleton College in Northfield, MN, and her Ph.D. in Cell Biology from Yale University, working with Mark Mooseker and Peter Novick. She was a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award Postdoctoral Fellow with Ron Vale at the University of California, San Francisco. In 2007 she joined the faculty at Harvard Medical School. Her research program is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms of cytoskeletal-based intracellular transport. Her group focuses on the microtubule cytoskeleton, aiming to understand how the motors that move along it work, how these motors are regulated in space and time, and the cell and systems biology of transport in cells. Dr. Reck-Peterson was the Associate Director of the Biological and Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program at Harvard Medical School from 2011-2014. Awards she has received include the New Innovator Award from the NIH and the American Society for Cell Biology WICB Junior Award for Excellence in Research.
Seminar Topic

 

Molecular Mechanisms of Microtubule-based Intracellular Transport

Microtubule-based intracellular transport is a fundamental process in all eukaryotic cells, required for cell division, many aspects of development, and neuronal function. We address how transport works on multiple scales, ranging from the biophysics of the motors, to their regulation and function in cells. Cytoskeletal molecular motors move unidirectionally along their tracks. This poses multiple problems, which I will discuss: 1) How do they get to the start of their track? 2) After arriving to the start of their track, how do they stay there until they have acquired cargo? 3) How is motility activated by cargo? 4) How do cargos bound by motors of opposite polarity (both dynein and kinesin) undergo net unidirectional motility? We use a variety of methods to address these problems including single-molecule and live-cell imaging, DNA origami, structural biology, and molecular genetics.

 

Laboratory

 

https://reck-peterson.med.harvard.edu/

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
John Hogenesch (Penn) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/380-hogenesch http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/380-hogenesch Location: Carl Icahn Lab, 101 - Princeton
Category: Quantitative & Computational Biology
Date: Mon, Sep 29, 2014 - Mon, Sep 29, 2014
Add Description: ]]>
Quantitative & Computational Biology Thu, 25 Sep 2014 10:27:14 -0400
Graham Hatfull (Pittsburgh) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/352-hatfull http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/352-hatfull Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Sep 24, 2014 - Wed, Sep 24, 2014
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
Hatfull
Graham F. Hatfull, Ph.D.
University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Graham Hatfull is Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh, the Eberly Family Professor of Biotechnology, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor. He received a B.Sc. (Hons) degree in Biological Sciences from Westfield College, University of London in 1978, and a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from Edinburgh University in 1981. He did postdoctoral work at Yale University in the Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry with Dr. Nigel Grindley, and at the Medical Research Council at Cambridge University, with Drs. Fred Sanger and Bart Barrell.  He has been at the University of Pittsburgh since 1988 and served as Chair of the Department of Biological Sciences from 2003 to 2011. As an HHMI Professor beginning in 2002, Dr. Hatfull developed the Phage Hunters Integrating Research and Education (PHIRE) program at the University of Pittsburgh, which served as a model for the nationally implemented HHMI Science Education Alliance Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science (SEA-PHAGES) program that introduces freshman undergraduate students to authentic scientific research in a two-term course. The SEA-PHAGES program involves 80 institutions across the US and over 2,000 freshman undergraduate students each year.

Dr. Hatfull’s research focuses on the molecular genetics of the mycobacteria and their bacteriophages. These studies take advantage of the intimacy of phage-host interactions to gain insights into the genetics and physiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human TB. The PHIRE and SEA-PHAGES programs have facilitated collection of a large number of completely sequenced mycobacteriophage genomes, providing key insights into viral diversity and evolution. The phages also provide a rich toolbox of new approaches to understanding M. tuberculosis, including development of vector systems, selectable markers, recombineering strategies, expression tools, and insights into mycobacterial physiology and pathogenesis.

Dr. Hatfull is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a teaching fellow of the National Academy of Science.  He has mentored 20 Ph.D. students, over 100 undergraduate student researchers, and 16 postdoctoral associates.  He has received funding from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.  He has received the University of Pittsburgh Chancellor’s Distinguished Research Award at both the junior and senior level, the University of Pittsburgh Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award, the Carski Teaching Award from the American Society for Microbiology, and holds the Eberly Family Professorship in Biotechnology. He serves on the Editorial Boards of Gene, Journal of Bacteriology, CBE Life Sciences Education, and Annual Reviews of Virology.

Seminar Topic

 

Exploration and Exploitation of Mycobacteriophages

Bacteriophages represent the majority of all biological entities.  The phage population is vast, dynamic, and old, and thus not surprisingly highly diverse. Using a broadly implemented program to introduce freshman undergraduates to scientific research we have gathered a large collection of sequenced mycobacteriophages, all known to infect a single strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis.  These phages reveal the extent of diversity, provide numerous examples of biological novelty, and provide a rich and deep toolbox for tuberculosis genetics and clinical applications.

Laboratory

 

http://www.pitt.edu/~gfh/

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Abby F. Dernburg, (UC, Berkeley) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/351-dernburg http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/351-dernburg Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Sep 17, 2014 - Wed, Sep 17, 2014
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
Dernburg
Abby Dernburg, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley/HHMI

Abby Dernburg is Howard Hughes Investigator and Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology at University of California, Berkeley.  Abby received a B.A. in biochemistry at the University of California, Berkeley and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of California, San Francisco.  Her research focuses on the molecular mechanisms underlying chromosome organization and dynamics during meiosis.

Seminar Topic

 

Chromosome Choreography During Meiosis

Abby Dernburg's lab is investigating the mechanisms that ensure accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis using C. elegans as their primary model system. Meiotic chromosomes and nuclei undergo dramatic reorganization to enable homologous chromosome pairing, synapsis, and recombination. This seminar will highlight our recent findings about the mechanisms and regulatory circuitry that mediate and coordinate these dramatic chromosome dynamics.

Laboratory

 

http://mcb.berkeley.edu/labs/dernburg

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Lars O. Hedin (EEB, Princeton) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/350-hedin http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/350-hedin Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Sep 10, 2014 - Wed, Sep 10, 2014
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
Lars Hedin
Lars Hedin, Ph.D.
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Princeton Environmental Institute
Princeton University

Lars Hedin is Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton University.  Lars received a B.S. from Cornell University in Biology, and a M.S. and Ph.D. from Yale University in Biogeochemistry and Ecosystem Studies.  Research in his laboratory centers on ecosystem analysis, with emphasis on the emergence and maintenance of geographically broad patterns in cycling of nutrients and greenhouse trace gases.

Seminar Topic

 

The curious story of symbiotic nitrogen fixation, biodiversity and the land carbon sink

Lars will explore the idea that symbiotic nitrogen fixation might constrain the ability of tropical forests to act as a global carbon sink.  Field experiments, observations, and theoretical models developed in my lab group point not only to nitrogen fixation as an essential mechanism, but also to biodiversity among nitrogen fixers as critical for maintaining the future carbon sink.  Their findings offer an example in which a symbiosis manifested at the scale of individual bacteria-plant interactions may scale up to influence the dynamics of the global land-atmospheric carbon cycle.

Laboratory

 

http://scholar.princeton.edu/lhedin

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 14:40:53 -0400
Alexander Ploss (Princeton) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/349-alexander-ploss-princeton http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/349-alexander-ploss-princeton Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Reunion Science Seminar
Date: Fri, May 30, 2014 - Fri, May 30, 2014
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Reunion Science Seminar

Speaker

Alexander Ploss

Alexander Ploss
Assistant Professor
Department of Molecular Biology
Princeton University

Alexander Ploss, Ph.D. completed his Bachelor's and Master's degree in biochemistry at the University of Tübingen, Germany including additional training the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the University of Washington, Seattle, and at the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, Germany. Dr. Ploss completed his Ph.D. in Immunology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center/Cornell University and postdoctoral training at the Rockefeller University. Prior to joining the Department of Molecular Biology at Princeton University in 2013 he was a research associate professor at the Center for the Study of Hepatitis C at the Rockefeller University. His research focuses on immune responses and pathogenesis to human infectious diseases, including hepatitis viruses, related flaviviruses, and malaria. His group combines tissue engineering, molecular virology/pathogenesis, and animal construction, to create and apply innovative technologies including humanized mouse models for the study and intervention of human hepatotropic infections. In recognition of his work he received a Kimberly Lawrence Cancer Research Discovery Fund Award, the Astellas Young Investigator Award of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Liver Scholar Award from the American Liver Foundation. Professor Ploss is a member of the Genomic Instability and Tumor Progression Program at the Cancer Institute of NJ.

Seminar TOPIC

Insights into Human Infectious Diseases from Humanized Mice

Research Lab

http://molbio.princeton.edu/labs/ploss

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Reunion Science Seminar Thu, 29 May 2014 09:59:32 -0400
Mina Bissell (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) CANCELLED http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/279-Bissell http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/279-Bissell Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, May 21, 2014 - Wed, May 21, 2014
Add Description:

THIS EVENT IS CANCELLED

 

MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

M J Bissell copyMina Bissell
Life Sciences Division
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

 

 

 

 

 

Seminar Topic

 “The Critical Role of Extracellular Matrix and Microenvironment in Metastasis and Dormancy”

The work from our laboratory in the last three decades has provided much impetus for the current recognition and acceptance of the importance of context/microenvironment and extracellular matrix (ECM) in regulation of gene expression, and has underscored the plasticity of both the differentiated state and tumors.

I will discuss why and how we developed, and use, 3-dimensional models of normal mammary gland and mammary tumors from both mice and humans to understand breast cancer, and will present recent work, shedding light on why tissue and organ architecture should become also a parameter in cancer research, and how architecture can regulate tissue-specificity as well as the plasticity of tumors. I will also discuss newer and more complex models we have developed to understand metastasis and dormancy and a screen that has allowed us to discover a new class of ‘oncogenes’ in the EGFR/PI3 Kinase.

We have shown a mechanism to underscore the model of dynamic reciprocity and how the ECM and basement membrane signal to nucleus, via intricate interactions with nuclear actin to provide cell and tissue quiescence, our new discoveries of unique functions for MMPs which may explain why anti-MMP therapies failed, and discovery of a novel movement through kinetic imaging of how a unit of tissue function in the mammary gland (an acinus) is formed in the normal breast, lost in malignancy and reformed by controlling the microenvironment and restoring tissue context and architecture.

We suggest these concepts and models have profound implications for diagnosis, prognosis, drug resistance, dormancy and therapy of cancer.

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400