Princeton University Molecular Biology - Archived Events http://molbio.princeton.edu Fri, 25 Jul 2014 10:24:20 -0400 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Alexander Ploss (Princeton) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/349-alexander-ploss-princeton http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/349-alexander-ploss-princeton Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Reunion Science Seminar
Date: Fri, May 30, 2014 - Fri, May 30, 2014
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Reunion Science Seminar

Speaker

Alexander Ploss

Alexander Ploss
Assistant Professor
Department of Molecular Biology
Princeton University

Alexander Ploss, Ph.D. completed his Bachelor's and Master's degree in biochemistry at the University of Tübingen, Germany including additional training the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the University of Washington, Seattle, and at the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, Germany. Dr. Ploss completed his Ph.D. in Immunology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center/Cornell University and postdoctoral training at the Rockefeller University. Prior to joining the Department of Molecular Biology at Princeton University in 2013 he was a research associate professor at the Center for the Study of Hepatitis C at the Rockefeller University. His research focuses on immune responses and pathogenesis to human infectious diseases, including hepatitis viruses, related flaviviruses, and malaria. His group combines tissue engineering, molecular virology/pathogenesis, and animal construction, to create and apply innovative technologies including humanized mouse models for the study and intervention of human hepatotropic infections. In recognition of his work he received a Kimberly Lawrence Cancer Research Discovery Fund Award, the Astellas Young Investigator Award of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Liver Scholar Award from the American Liver Foundation. Professor Ploss is a member of the Genomic Instability and Tumor Progression Program at the Cancer Institute of NJ.

Seminar TOPIC

Insights into Human Infectious Diseases from Humanized Mice

Research Lab

http://molbio.princeton.edu/labs/ploss

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Reunion Science Seminar Thu, 29 May 2014 09:59:32 -0400
Robert Weinberg (MIT) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/283-Weinberg http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/283-Weinberg Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Apr 30, 2014 - Wed, Apr 30, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Robert WeinbergRobert Weinberg
MIT

Dr. Robert A. Weinberg is a Founding Member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and the American Cancer Society and Daniel K. Ludwig Professor for Cancer Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).  

Dr. Weinberg and his colleagues used transfection to identify the first human cancer-causing gene, the ras oncogene, and the first known tumor suppressor gene, RB, the retinoblastoma gene. Subsequently, his group isolated the hTERT gene encoding the telomerease enzyme and used this gene, together with others, to create the first genetically defined human cancer cells.   Their discovery that a series of transcription factors (Twist, Goosecoid, FOXC2) can program multiple steps of the invasion-metastasis cascade holds the promise of revealing how cancer cells within primary tumors are able to disseminate in the bodies of cancer patients, generating the metastases that are responsible for 90% of cancer-associated mortality. 

Dr. Weinberg is the author or editor of five books and more than 350 articles.  Among these are three books, intended for a lay audience: “One Renegade Cell”, "Racing to the Beginning of the Road: The Search for the Origin of Cancer" and "Genes and the Biology of Cancer," co-authored with Dr. Harold E. Varmus.  More recently, he has written a textbook, “The Biology of Cancer”.  He is an elected Member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  He is a Member of the American Philosophical Society and the Institute of Medicine. 

Among Dr. Weinberg's many honors and awards are the Discover Magazine 1982 Scientist of the Year, the National Academy of Sciences/U.S. Steel Foundation Award in Molecular Biology, the Sloan Prize of the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation, the Bristol-Myers Award for Distinguished Achievement in Cancer Research, the Harvey Prize from the American Society for Technion/Israel Institute of Technology, the Gairdner Foundation International Award, the Keio Medical Foundation Prize, the 1997 National Medal of Science, the 2004 Wolf Foundation Prize, and the Prince of Asturias Science Prize.  He has served on scientific advisory boards for the Institute of Molecular Pathology in Vienna, Austria, the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot, Israel, and the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

Born in Pittsburgh in 1942, Dr. Weinberg received his B.S. (1964) and Ph.D. (1969) degrees in Biology from MIT. He undertook postdoctoral research at the Weizmann Institute and the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, and then returned to MIT in 1972.  In 1982, he was appointed Professor of Biology at MIT and that year became one of the Founding Members of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, also in Cambridge, MA.  In 2006 he was appointed as Director of MIT’s Ludwig Center for Cancer Research.

 

Seminar Topic

 

 

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Robert Weinberg (MIT) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/340-Weinberg http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/340-Weinberg Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Tue, Apr 29, 2014 - Tue, Apr 29, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Robert WeinbergRobert Weinberg
MIT

Dr. Robert A. Weinberg is a Founding Member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and the American Cancer Society and Daniel K. Ludwig Professor for Cancer Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).  

Dr. Weinberg and his colleagues used transfection to identify the first human cancer-causing gene, the ras oncogene, and the first known tumor suppressor gene, RB, the retinoblastoma gene. Subsequently, his group isolated the hTERT gene encoding the telomerease enzyme and used this gene, together with others, to create the first genetically defined human cancer cells.   Their discovery that a series of transcription factors (Twist, Goosecoid, FOXC2) can program multiple steps of the invasion-metastasis cascade holds the promise of revealing how cancer cells within primary tumors are able to disseminate in the bodies of cancer patients, generating the metastases that are responsible for 90% of cancer-associated mortality. 

Dr. Weinberg is the author or editor of five books and more than 350 articles.  Among these are three books, intended for a lay audience: “One Renegade Cell”, "Racing to the Beginning of the Road: The Search for the Origin of Cancer" and "Genes and the Biology of Cancer," co-authored with Dr. Harold E. Varmus.  More recently, he has written a textbook, “The Biology of Cancer”.  He is an elected Member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  He is a Member of the American Philosophical Society and the Institute of Medicine. 

Among Dr. Weinberg's many honors and awards are the Discover Magazine 1982 Scientist of the Year, the National Academy of Sciences/U.S. Steel Foundation Award in Molecular Biology, the Sloan Prize of the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation, the Bristol-Myers Award for Distinguished Achievement in Cancer Research, the Harvey Prize from the American Society for Technion/Israel Institute of Technology, the Gairdner Foundation International Award, the Keio Medical Foundation Prize, the 1997 National Medal of Science, the 2004 Wolf Foundation Prize, and the Prince of Asturias Science Prize.  He has served on scientific advisory boards for the Institute of Molecular Pathology in Vienna, Austria, the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot, Israel, and the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

Born in Pittsburgh in 1942, Dr. Weinberg received his B.S. (1964) and Ph.D. (1969) degrees in Biology from MIT. He undertook postdoctoral research at the Weizmann Institute and the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, and then returned to MIT in 1972.  In 1982, he was appointed Professor of Biology at MIT and that year became one of the Founding Members of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, also in Cambridge, MA.  In 2006 he was appointed as Director of MIT’s Ludwig Center for Cancer Research.

 

Seminar Topic

 

 

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Jason P. Gleghorn http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/326-Gleghorn http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/326-Gleghorn Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Colloquium
Date: Fri, Apr 25, 2014 - Fri, Apr 25, 2014
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Developmental Biology Colloquia

Speaker

Web - No PhotoJason P. Gleghorn
princeton University

 

 

 

 

Seminar Topic

 

 

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Developmental Colloquium Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Rui Costa (Champalimaud) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/309-Costa http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/309-Costa Location: PNI, Room A32 -
Category: Princeton Neuroscience Institute
Date: Thu, Apr 24, 2014 - Thu, Apr 24, 2014
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Neuroscience Seminar Series

Speaker

Rui-Costa

Rui Costa
Champalimaud Center for the Unknown
 
To study actions is to study the way we do things, which is different than studying how we remember stimuli, or facts and events. Some actions are innate or pre-wired (like swallowing or breathing). Others are learned anew throughout life, likely through a process of trial and feedback. We currently focus on understanding the processes mediating the latter.

A growing body of evidence suggests that cortico-basal ganglia circuits are involved in action generation and selection, in skill learning, and in learning goal-directed actions and habits. We center our efforts on investigating the cortico-basal ganglia mechanisms underlying these processes using an across-level approach, from molecules to circuits.

We chose to implement this integrative approach in mice because they combine the power of genetics, a mammalian brain with canonical cortico-basal ganglia loops that can generate and propagate oscillatory activity, and the possibility of accurately quantifying simple behaviors like action initiation (with EMG recordings or using inertial sensors) and stereotypic skill learning, and more elaborate behaviors like goal-directed actions.

 
Seminar Topic

Generating and shaping novel action repertoires

research lab

http://www.neuro.fchampalimaud.org/en/research/investigators/research-groups/group/Costa/

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Princeton Neuroscience Institute Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Michael Levine (UC, Berkeley) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/345-michael-levine http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/345-michael-levine Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Special Seminar
Date: Wed, Apr 23, 2014 - Wed, Apr 23, 2014
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Speaker

Michael Levine
University of california, berkeley
 
 
 
Seminar Topic

The Regulatory Genome in Animal Development and Evolution

Whole-genome comparisons suggest that organismal complexity scales with increasingly sophisticated mechanisms of gene regulation rather than increases in gene number. The genomes of higher animals are riddled with enhancers, with the human genome containing as many as a million enhancers. Thus, a typical gene is embedded in a complex regulatory landscape containing tens or hundreds of enhancers. An important future challenge is to integrate genome technologies with quantitative imaging methods to elucidate the functional organization of the regulatory genome during dynamic cellular processes. I will discuss our first efforts to examine enhancer dynamics in living embryos.

 

Research Lab

http://flydev.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/labpage/Levine_Lab/Welcome.html

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Special Seminar Fri, 14 Mar 2014 16:34:49 -0400
Michael Eisen (UC Berkeley/LBNL) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/305-Eisen http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/305-Eisen Location: Carl Icahn Lab, 101 - Princeton
Category: Quantitative & Computional Biology
Date: Mon, Apr 21, 2014 - Mon, Apr 21, 2014
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Quantitative & Computational Biology

Speaker

Michael EisenMichael Eisen
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
 
Welcome to Michael Eisen's lab in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) at University of California at Berkeley (UCB) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL). We are part of the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology of UCB and the Genomics Division of LBNL, and the California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences. We are located in Stanley Hall on the Berkeley campus. Our lab applies computational and experimental genomic approaches to study how genome sequences specify organismal form and function. We are particularly interested in the regulation of gene expression, and focus on how the information that specifies when and where genes are expressed is encoded in genome sequences, the role that regulated gene expression plays in animal development and the response of microbes to their environments, and how variation in and evolution of gene expression contributes to phenotypic variation and the remarkable diversity of life on Earth. This site contains a more detailed description of our research projects, an introduction to members of the lab, reprints of all of our publications, free downloadable and web-based software for the analysis of genome sequences and DNA microarray data, and other useful links and information.
 
 
Seminar Topic

TBA

Research Lab

http://www.eisenlab.org/eisen/

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Quantitative & Computional Biology Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Stephanie C. Weber http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/334-Weber http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/334-Weber Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Colloquium
Date: Fri, Apr 18, 2014 - Fri, Apr 18, 2014
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Developmental Biology Colloquia

Speaker

Web - No PhotoStephanie C. Weber
princeton University

 

 

 

 

Seminar Topic

 

 

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Developmental Colloquium Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
David Heeger (NYU) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/308-Heeger http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/308-Heeger Location: No Location Available (TBD) -
Category: Princeton Neuroscience Institute
Date: Thu, Apr 17, 2014 - Thu, Apr 17, 2014
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Neuroscience Seminar Series

Speaker

david heeger

David Heeger
New York University
 
The research spans an interdisciplinary cross-section of engineering, psychology, and neuroscience. In the fields of perceptual psychology and systems/cognitive neuroscience, we have worked on computational models of neuronal processing in the visual system, psychophysical (perceptual psychology) measurements of human vision, and neuroimaging. In the fields of image processing, computer vision, and computer graphics, we have worked on motion estimation and image registration, wavelet image representations, anisotropic diffusion (edge-preserving noise reduction), image fidelity metrics (for evaluating image data compression algorithms), texture analysis/synthesis and scientific visualization.
 
Seminar Topic

TBA

research lab

http://www.cns.nyu.edu/heegerlab/?page=home

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Princeton Neuroscience Institute Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Stephen Kowalczykowski (UC Davis) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/274-Kowalczykowski http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/274-Kowalczykowski Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Apr 16, 2014 - Wed, Apr 16, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Stephen KowalczykowskiStephen Kowalczykowski
University of California, Davis

Dr. Stephen Kowalczykowski received his Ph.D. in chemistry and biochemistry with Dr. Jacinto Steinhardt at Georgetown University.  His postdoctoral training was with Dr. Peter von Hippel at the University of Oregon.  Dr. Kowalczykowski started his independent faculty career in 1981 at Northwestern University Medical School. In 1991, he relocated to the University of California at Davis with the rank of Full Professor. He subsequently served as the Chair of Microbiology and the Director of the Center for Genetics and Development; currently, he is a Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, and of Molecular and Cell Biology.  Dr. Kowalczykowski’s honors include election to the National Academy of Sciences (2007), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2005), the American Academy of Microbiology (2003), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2001). Dr. Kowalczykowski’s research programs focus on the molecular mechanisms of recombinational DNA repair; the biochemical functions of DNA helicases; single-molecule biophysical analysis of protein-nucleic acid interactions; and BRCA2 and the molecular etiology of breast cancer.

Seminar Topic

Single-Molecule Visualization of Protein-DNA Complexes: Understanding Biology, One Molecule at a Time 

We can now watch individual proteins acting on single molecules of DNA. Visualization is achieved by capturing a single DNA molecule with optical traps or by tethering to a glass surface. Proteins are visualized via fluorescent reporters, and molecules are manipulated using microfluidic flowcells. Using these approaches, we have imaged proteins functioning in the homology-directed repair of DNA breaks. We can image the search for DNA homology conducted by the RecA, the self-assembly of RecA and RAD51 on DNA, and the function of mediators such as RecFOR and BRCA2.

Research Lab

 http://microbiology.ucdavis.edu/kowalczykowski/

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Steven Salzberg (Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/344-steven-salzberg http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/344-steven-salzberg Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Special Seminar
Date: Tue, Apr 15, 2014 - Tue, Apr 15, 2014
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Speaker

steven salzbergSteven Salzberg
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Steven Salzberg is Professor of Medicine, Biostatistics, and Computer Science at the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, where he is also Director of the Center for Computational Biology. His group's research focuses on the development of new computational methods for analysis of DNA from the latest sequencing technologies. Over the years they have developed and applied software to many problems in gene finding, genome assembly, comparative genomics, evolutionary genomics, and sequencing technology itself.

Professor Salzberg's current work emphasizes analysis of DNA and RNA sequenced with next-generation technology. His blogs and other writing cover topics on the impact of science on society including the effects of pseudoscience, the problems of alternative medicine, the anti-vaccination movement, gene patents, and the influence of sports on higher education. See the links on his lab home page for his scientific publications, his opinion pieces, and other news.

Seminar Topic

Computational Challenges of High Throughput Genome Sequence Analysis

Next-generation sequencing technology allows us to peer inside the cell in exquisite detail, revealing new insights into biology, evolution, and disease that would have been impossible to discover just a few years ago. The enormous volumes of data produced by NGS experiments present many computational challenges that we are working to address. In this talk, I will discuss some of our algorithmic solutions to two key alignment problems: (1) mapping sequences onto the human genome at very high speed, and (2) mapping and assembling transcripts from RNA-seq experiments. I will also discuss some of the problems that can arise during analysis of exome data, in which the gene-containing portions of the genome are sequenced in an effort to identify mutations responsible for disease. My group has developed algorithms to solve each of these problems, including the widely-used Bowtie program for fast DNA sequence alignment, the TopHat and Cufflinks programs for assembly of genes from transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) experiments, and the new DIAMUND program for detecting de novo mutations. This talk describes joint work with current and former lab members including Ben Langmead, Cole Trapnell, Daehwan Kim, Mihaela Pertea, and Geo Pertea.

Research Lab

http://ccb.jhu.edu/people/salzberg/Salzberg/Salzberg_Lab_Home.html

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Special Seminar Fri, 14 Mar 2014 16:34:49 -0400
Cheng Shi http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/333-Shi http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/333-Shi Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Colloquium
Date: Fri, Apr 11, 2014 - Fri, Apr 11, 2014
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Developmental Biology Colloquia

Speaker

Web - No PhotoCheng Shi
princeton University

 

 

 

 

Seminar Topic

 

 

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Developmental Colloquium Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Mark Churchland (Columbia) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/307-Churchland http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/307-Churchland Location: No Location Available (TBD) -
Category: Princeton Neuroscience Institute
Date: Thu, Apr 10, 2014 - Thu, Apr 10, 2014
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Neuroscience Seminar Series

Speaker

Mark Churchland

Mark Churchland
Columbia University
 
Your brain, and the neurons within it, respond to external stimuli such as a friend's face or voice. At the other extreme, the final output of your brain is a set of commands sent to your muscles. Yet most of the brain's activity is neither a reflexive response nor a direct motor command. The brain sustains and generates its own activity, and this is at the heart of the remarkable feats it can accomplish.

A central goal of our laboratory is to understand the neural dynamics that allow the brain to generate its own activity. We approach this problem in the context of voluntary movement. Voluntary movement requires a series of internally generated events that must unfold over time before the overt movement is produced. This gives us a unique opportunity to study activity that is internally generated but still relates to measureable events (e.g., the speed or accuracy of a movement).

We take a dynamical systems approach to understanding the neural events that drive movement. We are particularly interested in uncovering the 'rules of neural motion.' In this view, the right way to understand internally generated activity is to decipher how and why the neural 'state' at one moment in time leads to the neural state at the next moment in time.

Our belief is that an understanding of neural dynamics will shed a great deal of light on how the brain generates and controls movement normally, and on how this process can go awry in disease.

 
Seminar Topic

TBA

research lab

http://churchlandlab.neuroscience.columbia.edu/

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Princeton Neuroscience Institute Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Steven McCarroll (Harvard University) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/285-McCarroll http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/285-McCarroll Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Apr 09, 2014 - Wed, Apr 09, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Web - No PhotoSteven McCarroll
Harvard University

Steve McCarroll is a professor in the Genetics Department of Harvard Medical School. He is the Director of Genetics at the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute.

Steve was a Ph.D. student in Cori Bargmann’s lab (genetics and neuroscience in C. elegans) at U.C. San Francisco, then a postdoc in David Altshuler’s lab (human genetic polymorphism and the genetic basis of complex phenotypes) at MGH and the Broad Institute.

 

Seminar Topic

Where is the rest of the human genome?

Whole-genome sequencing is increasingly used to search for genetic variants underlying human disease.  In this seminar, I will describe ways in which every sequencing experiment can also be used to teach us surprising things about how genomes work in everyone.  First, there is extensive human genome sequence that is missing from maps of the human genome – but using a combination of mathematics and historical mixtures of human populations, we learned where these genes have been hiding and how they have remained hidden from view.  Second, we find that some regions of the human genome segregate in many different structural forms within human populations, an "extreme" form of structural variation that is contributing to human phenotypes.  Third, we developed ways to use whole genome sequence data to study active processes of DNA replication in human cells, with a surprising finding about how DNA replication varies from person to person.

 

Research Lab

 The McCarroll Lab

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Jeffrey Leek (Johns Hopkins) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/304-Leek http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/304-Leek Location: Carl Icahn Lab, 101 - Princeton
Category: Quantitative & Computional Biology
Date: Mon, Apr 07, 2014 - Mon, Apr 07, 2014
Add Description:

Quantitative & Computational Biology

Speaker

jeffrey leekJeffrey Leek
Johns Hopkins University
 
I develop quantitative tools for summarizing and understanding high-dimensional genomic data.
 
 
 

 

Seminar Topic

TBA

Research Lab

http://www.biostat.jhsph.edu/~jleek/research.html

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Quantitative & Computional Biology Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Mala Misra http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/332-Misra http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/332-Misra Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Colloquium
Date: Fri, Apr 04, 2014 - Fri, Apr 04, 2014
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Developmental Biology Colloquia

Speaker

Web - No PhotoMala Misra
princeton University

 

 

 

 

Seminar Topic

 

 

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Developmental Colloquium Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Doris Tsao (CalTech) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/306-Tsao http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/306-Tsao Location: No Location Available (TBD) -
Category: Princeton Neuroscience Institute
Date: Thu, Apr 03, 2014 - Thu, Apr 03, 2014
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Neuroscience Seminar Series

Speaker

Doris Tsao

Doris Tsao
California Institute of Technology
 
Mission The goal of our research is to understand the brain mechanisms for object recognition and spatial vision in primates. How does the brain construct a geometrically accurate percept of 3D space and how does it recognize the myriad objects within it? Approach he primate visual system contains a large number of distinct areas specialized for different functions. We use fMRI in alert monkeys to identify the regions most activated by a specific visual function, and then we use electrophysiology, microstimulation, optogenetics, anatomical tracing, and mathematical modeling to understand the detailed processing occurring within these areas. FMRI gives a global perspective of activity across the entire brain, revealing all the activated areas, while targeted single-unit recordings allow one to understand the function of each area in terms of spiking patterns of single neurons.

Hosted by Sabine Kastner

 
Seminar Topic

TBA

research lab

http://tsaolab.caltech.edu/?q=People_Tsao

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Princeton Neuroscience Institute Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Trisha Davis (University of Washington) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/275-Davis http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/275-Davis Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Apr 02, 2014 - Wed, Apr 02, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Trisha DavisTrisha N. Davis
University of Washington

Dr. Davis received her BA from UCSC in Computer Science and Biology and her PhD from Yale University.  Her thesis work, performed in the laboratory of Dr. John Cronan, concerned the assembly of a bacteriophage with an inner membrane.  During her postdoctoral fellowship in Dr. Jeremy Thorner’s lab, she studied calcium signalling.  She has been a professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Washington for 26 years and was recently appointed the Earl W. Davie/Zymogenetics Endowed Chair of Biochemistry.  Dr. Davis studies how cells assemble and regulate the machinery required for accurate chromosome segregation.  She is also the director of a multidisciplinary technology development research center.

Seminar Topic

Chromosome Segregation by the Mitotic Spindle: Investigations at the Intersection of Molecular Cell Biology, Biochemistry and Structural Biology

How does the cell ensure transmission of an exact complement of chromosomes each cell division? How does this process go awry in cancer cells? These are questions of interest to our lab. We use a variety of techniques from single-molecule biophysical approaches to biochemistry, genetics and microscopy to explore the regulation and assembly of the machinery that ensures each daughter cell receives a full set of chromosomes every cell division. 

Chromosomes are segregated to daughter cells by a microtubule-based molecular machine, the mitotic spindle.  The spindle has two poles, each one carrying an exact complement of chromosomes to each daughter cell. Spindle morphogenesis requires spatially controlled microtubule nucleation.  The proteins required for nucleation are known, but they are surprisingly inactive in isolated form.  We are studying how these proteins are activated to nucleate microtubules during spindle formation and how their activation is regulated.


Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Krishna Shenoy (Stanford) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/303-Shenoy http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/303-Shenoy Location: Carl Icahn Lab, 101 - Princeton
Category: Quantitative & Computional Biology
Date: Mon, Mar 31, 2014 - Mon, Mar 31, 2014
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Quantitative & Computational Biology

Speaker

Krishna ShenoyKrishna Shenoy
Stanford University
 
Shenoy conducts basic and applied research on neural prosthetic systems. Basic studies include investigating sensory-motor and cognitive functions in the primate cortex using a combination of behavioral, electrophysiological, and computational techniques to discover how populations of neurons represent movement plans. Applied studies include designing algorithms to read out these representations and developing prosthetic systems controlled by the neural activity. The ultimate goal of these neural prosthetic systems, or brain-computer interfaces, is to assist disabled patients.

 

Seminar Topic

TBA

Research Lab

http://www.stanford.edu/~shenoy/

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Quantitative & Computional Biology Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Bruce R. Levin (Emory University) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/343-Levin http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/343-Levin Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Fri, Mar 28, 2014 - Fri, Mar 28, 2014
Add Description:

MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

0123Bruce R. Levin
Emory University

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seminar Topic

The Population and Evolutionary Dynamics of Adaptive Immunity in Bacteria:  CRISPR and CAS are Not Just the Tools of Capitalist Molecular Biologists.

Arguable, surely to those who work on it, the demonstration that the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) regions and their associated sequences (Cas) that abound in the genomes of the majority of Archaea and nearly half the Bacteria can serve as an adaptive immune system has been the single most important new finding in Microbiology and Molecular Biology this millennium.   By incorporating 30 or so base pairs of the infecting DNA into regions between these palindromic repeats, when subsequently infected by DNA with sequences identical to that of the incorporated “spacers”, through a process mediated by small RNAs, CRISP-Cas encoding bacteria and archaea abort the infection.   When these infectious DNAs are those of necessarily lethal (lytic) bacterial viruses the advantages of CRISPR-Cas mediated immunity are straightforward and easily demonstrated experimentally as well as theoretical, albeit more kinky than anticipated.  But not all infectious DNAs are deleterious; some like plasmids and temperate bacteriophages may bear genes, such as those conferring resistance that in the presence of antibiotics that can be very much to the advantage of recipient bacteria.  In this talk I will present the results of the mathematical and computer simulation modeling and population and evolutionary dynamic and experiments we have been doing to explore the upside of CRISPR-Cas immunity, protection against infections against lethal infections with lytic and temperate phage, and the downside of this immune system, preventing the acquisition of plasmids and temperate phage bearing beneficial genes.   I will consider the nature of and factors limiting the CRISPR-Cas mediated Lamarckian - Darwinian arms races between bacteria and phage, and present a hypothesis to account for the extraordinary diversity in the existence, number and function of CRISPR-Cas systems within and between species of bacteria and archaea.

 

Research Lab

 http://www.eclf.net/

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400