Princeton University Molecular Biology - Archived Events http://molbio.princeton.edu Fri, 29 Apr 2016 09:00:12 -0400 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Yogesh Goyal (Shvartsman Lab, Princeton) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/509-goyal http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/509-goyal Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Biology Colloquia
Date: Fri, Apr 01, 2016 - Fri, Apr 01, 2016
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Developmental Biology Colloquia Thu, 10 Mar 2016 10:13:26 -0500
Anne Brunet (Stanford U) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/471-brunet http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/471-brunet Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Mar 30, 2016 - Wed, Mar 30, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Anne Brunet

Anne Brunet
Professor of Genetics
Stanford School of Medicine
Seminar Topic

Epigenetic and metabolic regulation of aging

Aging occurs in all sexual species and is associated with a constellation of diseases in humans. Yet a fundamental understanding of aging is still missing. My laboratory has developed a program to understand the aging process using the integration of model organisms with diverse lifespans. Using the short-lived worm C. elegans, we identified pathways involved in delaying aging in response to forces such as food and sex. For example, we found that modulations of specific regulators of stable chromatin states lead to lifespan extension and made the surprising discovery that lifespan extension can be inherited in a transgenerational epigenetic manner. We also showed that males induce the premature demise of the opposite sex in a pheromone-dependent manner, highlighting a ‘non-organismal autonomous’ mode of aging regulation. In parallel, we have used vertebrates to address complex questions about aging in cells absent in worms, such as adult stem cells. We found that nutrient-sensing pathways act in mice to preserve adult stem cell pools, and have recently integrated our discoveries in different organisms by identifying a chromatin signature linked to transcriptional consistency in diverse cell types and species. This has prompted us to assess the importance of variability in complex aging systems. Finally, we have pioneered the naturally short-lived African killifish as a new model for aging. We have developed tools to assess the evolution of different lifespans and to identify genes and principles involved in features specific to vertebrate aging, including tissue regeneration decline and susceptibility to disease.

Research 

The Brunet Lab

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Joel Tamayo (Gavis Lab, Princeton) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/508-tamayo http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/508-tamayo Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Biology Colloquia
Date: Fri, Mar 25, 2016 - Fri, Mar 25, 2016
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Developmental Biology Colloquia Thu, 10 Mar 2016 10:13:26 -0500
Daniel Portnoy (UC, Berkeley) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/470-portnoy http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/470-portnoy Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Mar 23, 2016 - Wed, Mar 23, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Photo of Dan Portnoy

Daniel A. Portnoy
Professor, University of California, Berkeley
Dr. Portnoy received his undergraduate degree in bacteriology from UCLA in 1978 where his passion for microbiology.  He next earned his Ph.D. in 1983 under the tutelage of Stanley Falkow at the University of Washington and Stanford.  In the Falkow Lab, he worked on a conserved virulence plasmid in Yersinia enterocolitica, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. pestis, and discovered what turned out to be the first effectors of type III secretion, though he incorrectly concluded that the “Yops” were outer-membrane proteins. To further his appreciation of host cells, he did his postdoctoral fellowship in the Zanvil Cohn Laboratory of Cellular Physiology and Immunology at the Rockefeller University in New York, working with Jay Unkeless and Jeff Ravetch.  At Rockefeller he worked on macrophage Fc receptors and lysosomal proteases. During a two-year stint at Washington University in St. Louis, he began working on Listeria monocytogenes as a model intracellular pathogen.  In 1988, he joined the Department of Microbiology at the University of Pennsylvania, where he collaborated with Lew Tilney in the Biology Department and made the observation that L. monocytogenes spreads from one cell to another by exploiting a host cell system of actin polymerization. His lab also defined the role of the listerial hemolysin in mediating dissolution of phagosomes. In collaboration with Phil Youngman, he showed that expression of the L. monocytogenes hemolysin by Bacillus subtilis led to its growth inside of host cells. Portnoy collaborated with Yvonne Paterson, who also arrived at Penn in 1988, on the use of L. monocytogenes as a recombinant vector-based vaccine for the induction of cell-mediated immunity. Both Paterson and Portnoy went on to work with biotech companies to develop vaccines for both cancer and infectious disease applications. Numerous clinical trials based on their discoveries have shown promising results as immunotherapeutic treatments for cancer. In 1997, Portnoy moved to UC Berkeley where he currently holds joint appointments in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and in the Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology in the School of Public Health, and he was recently appointed as the Edward E. Penhoet Distinguished Chair in Global Public Health and Infectious Diseases.  While his lab continues to examine basic aspects of molecular and cell biology, the lab focus has moved into both innate and acquired immunity. Portnoy and collaborators have shown that immune cells recognize c-di-AMP, a novel and essential bacterial signaling molecule, secreted by L. monocytogenes through multidrug resistance efflux transporters.  Portnoy and Russell Vance identified that STING was the host receptor of cyclic-di-nucleotides (CDNs) that leading to the production of type I interferon and other co-regulated genes.  Modified CDNs are now being evaluated for clinical application as adjuvants and for cancer immunotherapy.  In 2013, Portnoy’s contributions were recognized by his election to the National Academy of Sciences.  
Seminar Topic

Cyclic-di-AMP: an essential Listeria monocytogenes signaling molecule that activates a host pathway of innate immunity

Prevention and treatment of diseases caused by intracellular pathogens remains one of the largest challenges facing the international biomedical community. A central problem that we address is how intracellular pathogens are recognized by the host and how the immune system integrates multiple signals to induce an appropriate response, and conversely, how pathogens avoid and/or manipulate the host response to promote their pathogenesis.  We have chosen to approach this problem by a detailed analysis of Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular pathogen that has been studied for many decades as a model system with which to dissect basic aspects of infection & immunity.  In this seminar, I’ll discuss a genetic screen for bacterial mutants that induced elevated or diminished levels of a host innate immune response to infection that results in the host’s expression of IFN-b.  The results of the screen and subsequent biochemistry led to the discovery that L. monocytogenes secretes cyclic-di-AMP (CDA) through multidrug efflux pumps (MDRs) that activates a host protein called STING leading to the expression of IFN-b.  CDA turns out to be a conserved and essential small signaling molecule and I’ll discuss some of our recent results on its function in controlling bacterial metabolism. I’ll also mention some recent results using L. monocytogenes and CDA for cancer immunotherapies. 

Crimmins GT, Herskovits AA, Rehder K, Sivick KE, Lauer P, Dubensky TW Jr, and Portnoy DA. (2008). Listeria monocytogenes multidrug resistance transporters activate a cytosolic surveillance pathway of innate immunity. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Jul 22;105(29):10191-6. Epub 2008 Jul 16. PMCID: PMC2481368

Woodward JJ, Iavarone AT, Portnoy DA. (2010). c-di-AMP secreted by intracellular Listeria monocytogenes activates a host type I interferon response. Science. 2010 Jun 25;328(5986): 1703-5. Epub 2010 May 27. PMCID: PMC3156580

Witte CE, Whiteley AT, Burke TP, Sauer, JD, Portnoy DA, Woodward JJ. (2013). Cyclic di-AMP is critical for Listeria monocytogenes growth, cell wall homeostasis, and establishment of infection. mBio. 2013 May 28;4(3). Doi:pii:e00282-13. 1128/mBio.00282-13. PMCID: PMC3663569

Archer KA, Durack J, and Portnoy DA. (2014). STING-dependent Type I IFN production inhibits cell-mediated immunity to Listeria monocytogenes.  PLoS Pathog. 2014 Jan;10(1):e1003861. doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1003861. Epub 2014 Jan 2. PMCID: PMC3879373

Whiteley AT, Pollock AJ, Portnoy DA.  (2015). The PAMP c-di-AMP is essential for Listeria growth in macrophages and rich but not minimal media, due to a toxic increase in (p)ppGpp. Cell Host Microbe. 2015 Jun 10;17(6):788-98. doi: 10.1016/j.chom.2015.05.006. Epub 2015 May 28.  PMCID: PMC4469362

Research 

The Portnoy Lab

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Robert E. Schwartz (Cornell) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/502-schwartz http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/502-schwartz Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MD/Ph.D Program
Date: Mon, Mar 21, 2016 - Mon, Mar 21, 2016
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Rutgers-Princeton MD/PhD Program Distinguished Speaker

Speaker
res2025.jpg  Robert E. Schwartz, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University
Attending Physician, New York-Presbyterian Hospital


Dr. Robert Schwartz is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University and an Attending Physician, New York-Presbyterian Hospital Cornell campus. A native New Yorker he obtained his B.E. in Chemical Engineering from the Cooper Union and his M.D. and Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Minnesota. He completed his Internal Medicine residency at Barnes-Jewish Hospital at Washington University in St. Louis and his fellowship training in Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. In his patient practice Dr. Schwartz’s focuses on the care of patient with liver disease. His interests include viral hepatitis, autoimmune causes of liver disease, Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease as well as metabolic causes of liver disease.  

Dr. Robert Schwartz is also an active physician scientist focused on developing and building models of human liver disease in vitro. He uses stem cell biology, hepatocyte biology and incorporates engineering techniques to better understand human liver disease with the goal to improve clinical therapy.

Seminar

Liver disease is an important clinical problem, impacting over 30 million Americans and over 600 million people worldwide. It is the 12th leading cause of death in the United States, 10th leading cause of death in Europe and the 16th worldwide. Due to a paucity of donor organs, several thousand Americans die yearly while waiting for liver transplantation. Unfortunately, alternative tissue sources such as fetal hepatocytes and hepatic cell lines are unreliable, difficult to reproduce, and do not fully recapitulate hepatocyte phenotype and functions. As a consequence, alternative cell sources that do not have these limitations have been sought. Human embryonic stem cell- and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells may enable cell based therapeutics, the study of the mechanisms of human disease and human development, and provide a platform for screening the efficacy and toxicity of pharmaceuticals. iPS cells can be differentiated in a step-wise fashion with high efficiency and reproducibility into hepatocyte-like cells that exhibit morphologic and phenotypic characteristics of hepatocytes. In addition, iPS-derived hepatocyte-like cells (iHLCs) possess functional hepatic activity as they secrete urea, alpha-1-antitrypsin, albumin, and have cytochrome P450 activity. In this talk we will examine different applications using iHLCs to model human liver disease. In the future, we envision that iHLCs will be used as in vitro models of human disease, and in the longer term, provide an alternative cell sources for drug testing and clinical therapy.

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MD/Ph.D Program Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Juan Dong (Waksman Institute, Rutgers) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/507-dong http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/507-dong Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Biology Colloquia
Date: Fri, Mar 18, 2016 - Fri, Mar 18, 2016
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Developmental Biology Colloquia Thu, 10 Mar 2016 10:13:26 -0500
Understanding Perfectionism http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/499-understanding-perfectionism http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/499-understanding-perfectionism Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 005 - Princeton
Category: Mindfulness Workshop
Date: Thu, Mar 17, 2016 - Thu, Mar 17, 2016
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For faculty, staff, postdocs, and graduate students

Understanding Perfectionism

We’re bombarded by messages from the media that we must be the best, appear smart, act perfect and stay happy forever. Perfectionism is often mistakenly seen as necessary for success, but in reality perfectionist attitudes interfere with success and learning. In this mindfulness workshop, we will discuss some myths and realities of perfectionism, and reflect upon ways to be healthy strivers. 

Facilitated by Shefalika Gandhi, LCSW

http://uhs.princeton.edu/about-us/staff/shefalika-gandhi-lcsw

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Mindfulness Workshop Thu, 18 Dec 2014 14:07:07 -0500
Daniel Grimes (Burdine Lab, Princeton) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/506-grimes http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/506-grimes Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Biology Colloquia
Date: Fri, Mar 11, 2016 - Fri, Mar 11, 2016
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Developmental Biology Colloquia Thu, 10 Mar 2016 10:13:26 -0500
Zhijian 'James' Chen (UT Southwestern Medical Center) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/469-chen http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/469-chen Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Mar 09, 2016 - Wed, Mar 09, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

jchen

Zhijian 'James' Chen
Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
George L. MacGregor Distinguished Chair in Biomedical Science
Professor, Department of Molecular Biology
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Zhijian ‘James’ Chen is an Investigator of Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. He is also George L. MacGregor Distinguished Chair in Biomedical Science at UT Southwestern. Prior to moving to Dallas, Chen was a senior scientist at ProScript Inc. where he helped discover the proteasome inhibitor VELCADE, a medicine used for the treatment of multiple myeloma. After joining UT Southwestern in 1997, Chen discovered the regulatory role of ubiquitination in protein kinase activation in the NF-kB and MAP kinase pathways. In addition, he discovered the Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling (MAVS) protein that reveals a new role of mitochondria in immunity. More recently, Chen discovered cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) as a cytosolic DNA sensor and a new cyclic di-nucleotide signaling pathway that mediate innate immune responses in animal cells. For his work, Chen has received numerous honors including the National Academy of Science Award in Molecular Biology (2012) and the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) Merck Award (2015). Chen is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.


Seminar Topic

Enemy Within - Immune and Autoimmune Responses to Cytosolic DNA

Research 

Zhijian Chen Faculty Profile

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Alice Meuniere (ENS Biology) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/505-meuniere http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/505-meuniere Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Biology Colloquia
Date: Fri, Mar 04, 2016 - Fri, Mar 04, 2016
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Alice Meuniere

ENS Biology, Paris France, guest of Thomas Gregor

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Developmental Biology Colloquia Thu, 10 Mar 2016 10:13:26 -0500
Andy Minn (Penn) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/468-minn http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/468-minn Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Mar 02, 2016 - Wed, Mar 02, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Photo of Andy Minn

Andy J. Minn, MD., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology
University of Pennsylvania
Dr. Andy Minn is a board certified radiation oncologist and is affiliated with Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute at University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He received his medical degree from University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, then studied under Dr. Joan Massague at Sloan-Kettering Memorial Institute in New York City before returning to University of Chicago, Dept. of Radiation & Cellular Oncology, Ludwig Center for Metastasis Research as an Assistant Professor. He joined Univ. of Penn in 2010 and he is one of 39 doctors at Hospitals of the University of Pennsylvania-Penn Presbyterian and one of 24 at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center who specialize in Radiation Oncology.
Seminar Topic

Response and Resistance to Radiation and Immune Checkpoint Blockade for Cancer

My laboratory is focused on understanding how cancer acquires treatment resistance to both conventional therapies and to immunotherapies, and how resistance can be overcome. We have identified regulatory networks and signaling pathways that not only predict but also promote treatment resistance. These signaling pathways are normally associated with an anti-viral response, suggesting an intriguing overlap between anti-viral signaling and ways that cancer can evade the cytotoxic effects of therapy and/or the immune system. We are currently investigating this overlap by studying the regulation by the tumor microenvironment, how anti-viral responses are activated, and the mechanisms by which these pathways govern resistance. Studies using mouse models have been performed in parallel with analogous clinical trials in order to corroborate pre-clinical results with human patients 

Research 

Andy J. Minn Profile

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Colin Watson (Wieschaus Lab, Princeton) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/504-watson http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/504-watson Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Biology Colloquia
Date: Fri, Feb 26, 2016 - Fri, Feb 26, 2016
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Developmental Biology Colloquia Thu, 10 Mar 2016 10:13:26 -0500
Suzanne Eaton (Max Planck Institute) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/467-eaton http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/467-eaton Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Feb 24, 2016 - Wed, Feb 24, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Suzanne Eaton

Suzanne Eaton, Ph.D.
Research Group Leader
Max Planck Institute
Suzanne Eaton is a senior research group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, and Professor at the Dresden Technical University. She obtained her PhD from UCLA studying immunoglobulin gene transcription.  She moved into developmental biology as a postdoc with Tom Kornberg at UCSF, where she worked on identifying the signaling circuits that set up the AP boundary organizer in Drosophila wing discs. To more deeply understand the cell biological mechanisms underlying epithelial development, she moved to the EMBL Cell Biology Programme for a second postdoc with Kai Simons. Her own research group (since 1999) has focused on the cell biological and biophysical mechanisms underlying development, encompassing topics that range from tissue mechanics through signaling and metabolism.
Seminar Topic

Mechanics of Drosophila pupal wing morphogenesis: an interplay between active and stress-induced cell dynamics

Research LAB

Suzanne Eaton Research

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Kush M. Parmar (5AM Ventures) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/492-parmar http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/492-parmar Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: MOL BIO Translational Research Seminar
Date: Fri, Feb 19, 2016 - Fri, Feb 19, 2016
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MOL BIO Translational Research Seminar 

Speaker

Kush M. Parmar

Kush M. Parmar, M.D., Ph.D.
Managing Partner
5AM Ventures

 
Seminar Topic

Bridging two worlds: advancing academic science into biotech in the new age of biomedical innovation

The way medicines are discovered and developed has changed dramatically in the past decade, increasingly bringing the worlds of academia and industry far closer together in the pursuit of therapeutic advances. Industry’s eagerness to partner at earlier stages notwithstanding, key elements around a scientific breakthrough need to be in place to improve its prospects of ultimately being successful. Relevant examples of this new ecosystem will be shared through the lens of a Department of Molecular Biology alumnus who transitioned from academia to biotech venture capital and entrepreneurship. Importantly, as the world of biomedical innovation continues to evolve, so have the requirements and paths for academic discoveries to make their way into industry. Based on a few case studies and observations from the “front lines” of biotech entrepreneurship, some thoughts and advice for aspiring life sciences entrepreneurs will be shared.

Kush is a Managing Partner at 5 AM Ventures, a venture capital firm "dedicated to creating value in early-stage life science companies." Kush was in the Wieschaus lab as a Molecular Biology and Medieval Studies major at Princeton, and also holds a PhD in Experimental Pathology from Harvard University and an MD from Harvard Medical School. He previously served as Acting VP of Strategy and Corporate Development at Novira, and as Board Observer for Envoy Achaogen, and Pulmatrix. Kush recently joined the Advisory Council of the Department of Molecular Biology.

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public.

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MOL BIO Translational Research Seminar Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Emma Farley (Princeton) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/503-farley http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/503-farley Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Biology Colloquia
Date: Fri, Feb 19, 2016 - Fri, Feb 19, 2016
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Developmental Biology Colloquia Thu, 10 Mar 2016 10:13:26 -0500
The Art of Conversation http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/498-the-art-of-conversation http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/498-the-art-of-conversation Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 005 - Princeton
Category: Mindfulness Workshop
Date: Thu, Feb 18, 2016 - Thu, Feb 18, 2016
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For faculty, staff, postdocs, and graduate students

The Art of Conversation

In today’s world, we turn away from each other, bent over computers, iPads, and phones, trying to connect online rather than with the people right in front of us. In this workshop, let’s discuss what we lose when we text instead of talk. Let’s reclaim the art of conversation and truly understand one another through the practice of mindfulness. Includes light lunch

Facilitated by Shefalika Gandhi, LCSW

http://uhs.princeton.edu/about-us/staff/shefalika-gandhi-lcsw

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Mindfulness Workshop Thu, 18 Dec 2014 14:07:07 -0500
Yukiko Yamashita (U of Michigan) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/465-yamashita http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/465-yamashita Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Feb 17, 2016 - Wed, Feb 17, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Photo of Yukiko Yamashita

Yukiko Yamashita, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology
University of Michigan

Research Associate Professor
Center for Stem Cell Biology
Life Sciences Institute
 
HHMI Investigator

Yukiko Yamashita obtained her Ph.D. from Kyoto University, Japan; completing the postdoctoral fellowship with Minx Fuller at Stanford University.  She started her own laboratory at the University of Michigan in 2007, and is currently an associate professor at the University of Michigan.

She studies how adult stem cells divide asymmetrically, giving rise to one stem cell and one differentiating cell, to maintain tissue homeostasis in the context of the stem cell niche. The particular focus is on how general cell biological processes, such as cell cycle regulation and cytoskeleton organization, which are shared by many other non-stem cells, are modulated in a stem cell-specific manner to fulfill stem cell function. 

Yamashita is a recipient of 2008 Searle Scholar Award, 2009 ASCB WICB junior award, 2011 MacArthur Fellowship, and is an HHMI investigator since 2014. 

Seminar Topic

Asymmetric stem cell division in tissue homeostasis

Adult stem cells continuously supply highly differentiated but short-lived cells, such as blood, skin, intestinal epithelium, and sperm cells, throughout life. To maintain the balance between stem cells and differentiating cells, a failure of which may lead to tumorigenesis through excess self-renewal or tissue degeneration through excess differentiation, many stem cells have the potential to divide asymmetrically so that each division produces one stem cell and one differentiating cell.

Drosophila male germ line stem cells (GSCs) serve as an ideal model system to study stem cell behavior. They reside in the stem cell niche, which specify stem cell identity by sending essential signal(s). Stem cells have elaborate cellular mechanisms to ensure the asymmetric outcome of the division, producing one stem cell and one differentiating cell, which is the key to tissue homeostasis.

I will present the latest discoveries on the mechanisms that ensure asymmetric outcome of the stem cell divisions.

Research LAB

Yukiko Yamashita Lab

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
SMART Goals for a Heart Healthy Lifestyle http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/497-smart http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/497-smart Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 118 - Princeton
Category: Fun Committee
Date: Fri, Feb 05, 2016 - Fri, Feb 05, 2016
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Fun Committee Events

In honor of National Heart Month and Go Red for Women Day, University Health Coaches will offer a presentation for the MOL BIO community focused on providing easy-to-incorporate strategies to improve and maintain your heart health.  Learn to set SMART Goals for successful heart-healthy lifestyle.

resented by:  Gerry Pierre and Lisa Calabrese, University Health Coaches

Lunch will be available; attendance for this event is limited to 25.  RSVP by February 1.

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Fun Committee Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Shelby Blythe (Princeton U) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/496-blythe http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/496-blythe Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Special Seminar
Date: Wed, Feb 03, 2016 - Wed, Feb 03, 2016
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Special Seminar

Speaker
shelby
Shelby Blythe
Deapartment of Molecular Biology
Princeton University
Seminar Topic

Transcription, chromatin remodeling, and cell cycle control during early embryogenesis

Shelby ResearchHistorically, our knowledge of the genetic interactions that shape and pattern the embryo has far surpassed our understanding of how chromatin structure regulates gene expression. I have developed technologies for measuring chromatin accessibility (ATAC-seq) and occupancy (ChIP-seq) to address how changes in chromatin structure operate over short (3 to 20 minute) timescales to alter the gene-regulatory landscape in Drosophila embryos. With these approaches, I have measured the large scale remodeling events that establish a chromatin ‘ground state’, and have characterized how spatially restricted patterns of chromatin accessibility arise in response to patterning information. These large scale changes in chromatin structure are functionally linked to simultaneous cell cycle remodeling events. By exploring this functional interaction, I have developed genetic approaches for identifying rate-limiting factors for driving the large scale coordinated remodeling of embryonic promoters. These experiments serve as the basis for the future systematic examination of how fine-scale control of chromatin architecture underlies the embryonic developmental program.

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public.

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Special Seminar Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Jeannie T. Lee (Harvard) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/466-lee http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/archive/event/466-lee Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Jan 27, 2016 - Wed, Jan 27, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Jeannie

Jeannie T. Lee, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor of Genetics and Pathology
Harvard Medical School

Molecular Biologist
Massachusetts General Hospital
 
HHMI Investigator
Jeannie T. Lee is an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, and a Member of the National Academy of Sciences. She is also Co-Director of the Harvard Epigenetics Initiative. Dr. Lee specializes in the study of epigenetic regulation by long noncoding RNAs and employs X-chromosome inactivation as a model system. For her work on RNA-mediated chromatin change, Dr. Lee became the recipient of the 2010 Molecular Biology Prize from the National Academy of Sciences, is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and was named a Distinguished Graduate Award of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. She received her A.B. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Harvard University, obtained M.D.-Ph.D. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and did postgraduate training at the Whitehead Institute/MIT and at the Massachusetts General Hospital. She was also a Basil O’Connor Scholar and a Pew Scholars, and, until recently, served on the Board of Directors of the Genetics Society of America. In 2011, she co-founded RaNA Therapeutics to harness the potential of long noncoding RNAs to treat disease./td>
Seminar Topic

X-inactivation as a model for epigenetic regulation by long noncoding RNA

Research LAB

Jeannie Lee Lab

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400