Princeton University Molecular Biology - Molecular Biology Calendar of Events http://molbio.princeton.edu Sun, 26 Jun 2016 02:05:21 -0400 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Roger Perlmutter http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/493-perlmutter http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/493-perlmutter Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Gilbert Lecture Series
Date: Thu, Apr 07, 2016 - Thu, Apr 07, 2016
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Gilbert Lecture Series

Speaker
Roger



 
Roger Perlmutter  
Executive Vice President and President, Merck Research Laboratories

Roger M. Perlmutter, M.D., Ph.D., is executive vice president and president of Merck Research Laboratories, Merck’s global R&D organization. Before joining Merck, Dr. Perlmutter was executive vice president and head of R&D at Amgen, from January 2001 to February 2012. During his tenure, he oversaw the development and subsequent approval of a number of novel biologic and small molecule medicines in the areas of cancer, endocrinology, hematology, inflammation and osteoporosis. 

Prior to joining Amgen, Dr. Perlmutter worked at Merck Research Laboratories and held roles of increasing responsibility from 1997 to 2001, culminating in his appointment to executive vice president of Worldwide Basic Research and Preclinical Development. He joined Merck as a senior vice president in February 1997. More recently, he served as a director of several biotechnology companies and was a science partner at The Column Group, a biotechnology-focused venture capital firm. 

Before assuming leadership roles in industry, Dr. Perlmutter was a professor in the Departments of Immunology, Biochemistry and Medicine at the University of Washington, Seattle, and also served as chairman of its Department of Immunology, where he was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. His research focused on understanding the signaling pathways that control lymphocyte activation. Prior to his role at the University of Washington, he was a lecturer in the Division of Biology at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena. 

Dr. Perlmutter graduated from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and received his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He pursued clinical training in internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, and at the University of California, San Francisco. 

Dr. Perlmutter is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. 

Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_M._Perlmutter

Seminar Topic

Why Drugs Matter (and How to Make Them Better)

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public.

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Gilbert Lecture Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Dorothy Lerit (National Institutes of Health) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/510-lerit http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/510-lerit Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Biology Colloquia
Date: Fri, Apr 08, 2016 - Fri, Apr 08, 2016
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Developmental Biology Colloquia Thu, 10 Mar 2016 10:13:26 -0500
Rezma Shresta (Devenport Lab, Princeton) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/511-shresta http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/511-shresta Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Biology Colloquia
Date: Fri, Apr 15, 2016 - Fri, Apr 15, 2016
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Developmental Biology Colloquia Thu, 10 Mar 2016 10:13:26 -0500
Yifan Cheng (UCSF) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/474-cheng http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/474-cheng Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Apr 20, 2016 - Wed, Apr 20, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Yifan

Yifan Cheng, Ph.D. (程亦凡)
Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics
University of California, San Francisco 
lede-image-xtalDr. Yifan Cheng is currently an Investigator of Howard Hughes Medical Institute and a Professor at Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California San Francisco (UCSF). He received his Ph.D. degree in 1991 from Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). From 1991 to 1996, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Department of Physics, University of Oslo (NTNF Fellow), and Max-Planck-Institut für Metallforschung (Alexander von Humboldt Fellow). In 1996, he changed his research field to structural biology, and received further training in electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) from Professor Kenneth Taylor at Florida State University and Professor Yoshinori Fujiyoshi at Kyoto University. In 1999, he joined the laboratory of Professor Thomas Walz at Harvard Medical School. In 2006, he became a faculty at UCSF and stayed there ever since. He has been an HHMI Investigator since 2015. His laboratory studies three-dimensional structures of macromolecule by single particle cryo-EM.
Seminar Topic

Single particle cryo-EM of membrane proteins – a revolution in structural biology

Research 

Yifan Cheng Lab

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Work/ Life Balance http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/500-work-life-balance http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/500-work-life-balance Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 005 - Princeton
Category: Mindfulness Workshop
Date: Thu, Apr 21, 2016 - Thu, Apr 21, 2016
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For faculty, staff, postdocs, and graduate students

Work/ Life Balance

Americans spend more time on the job than people in most developed countries, and often don't even use all of the vacation days! In this workshop, we will discuss strategies to live a life that leads to health and balance. The practice of mindfulness can help us succeed in our personal and professional lives.

Facilitated by Shefalika Gandhi, LCSW

http://uhs.princeton.edu/about-us/staff/shefalika-gandhi-lcsw

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Mindfulness Workshop Thu, 18 Dec 2014 14:07:07 -0500
James Spurlin (Nelson Lab, Princeton) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/512-spurlin http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/512-spurlin Location: Schultz Lab, 107 - Princeton
Category: Developmental Biology Colloquia
Date: Fri, Apr 22, 2016 - Fri, Apr 22, 2016
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Developmental Biology Colloquia Thu, 10 Mar 2016 10:13:26 -0500
Leor Weinberger (UC, San Francisco) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/475-cheng http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/475-cheng Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Apr 27, 2016 - Wed, Apr 27, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Weinberger

Dr. Leor Weinberger
Associate Investigator, Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology
Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics
University of California, San Francisco
Dr. Weinberger is a Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics at UCSF and a Senior Investigator at the Gladstone Institutes where he supervises a joint computational and experimental lab.  He was previously faculty at UCSD, trained as a Lewis Thomas Fellow at Princeton, and received his Ph.D. in Biophysics at Berkeley as an HHMI fellow.  He has been recognized by a number of awards, including: a Pew Scholarship in the Biomedical Sciences, an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, the W.M. Keck Research-Excellence Award, the Bill and Melinda Grand Challenges in Global Health Award.  He is the only individual to receive the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, the NIH Avant-Garde Award, and the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award.  His lab pioneered the study of HIV's decision circuit, providing the first experimental demonstration that stochastic fluctuations (‘noise’) in gene expression are harnessed for biological fate selection.  Noise was subsequently shown to drive fate decisions from bacteria to cancer and is now recognized as a major barrier to eradication of latent HIV.  These studies led to the lab's discovery of noise-enhancer molecules that substantially increase the efficacy of transcriptional activators exposing new unexplored axis for drug discovery (Dar et al., Science 2014).   In parallel, the lab’s analysis of herpesvirus gene circuitry led to discovery of the transcriptional accelerator circuit (Teng et al., Cell 2012), exposing a new class of therapeutic targets and a first-in-class CMV-antiviral molecule (patent #2014127148).
Seminar Topic

Harnessing transcriptional ’noise’ to control cell fate

Research 

Weinberger Lab - Virology and Immunology

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Adam Frost (UCSF) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/476-frost http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/476-frost Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, May 04, 2016 - Wed, May 04, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Adam Frost

Adam Frost, MD., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Biophysics
University of California San Francisco
Seminar Topic

Function Follows Form: surprising insights into cell biology from the cryo-EM revolution

Work in our lab is connected by a common vision: to see the cell’s macromolecules get together and come to life.  We study biomolecular machines that are too fragile to purify to homogeneity, too large or too flexible to crystallize, or that depend upon lipids for their form and function.  In order to derive unique insights into cell biology and human disease, we integrate atomic structure determination by cryo-EM with genetics, biochemistry, and diverse imaging techniques.

Research 

Frost Lab

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Ruedi Aebersold (Institute of Molecular Systems Biology, Zurich) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/477-aebersold http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/477-aebersold Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, May 11, 2016 - Wed, May 11, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker

Photo of Ruedi Aebersold

Ruedi Aebersold
Professor

Department of Biology
Institute of Molecular Systems Biology, ETH Zurich / 
Faculty of Science, University of Zurich

Seminar Topic

Genotypic Variability and the Quantitative Proteotype

The question how genetic variability is translated into phenotypes is fundamental in biology and medicine. Powerful genomic technologies now determine genetic variability at a genomic level and at unprecedented speed, accuracy and (low) cost. Concurrently, life style monitoring devices and improved clinical diagnostic procedures generate an even larger amount of phenotypic information. To date the effects of genomic variability on the expressed information of the cell, and thus on the phenotype, have been mainly studied by transcript profiling. The systematic determination of the effects of genomic variability on the proteotype (the acute state of the proteome of a cell) is a challenging analytical chemistry problem because a large number of proteins need to be precisely and consistently quantified across a large number of samples of a cohort. In contrast to the next generation sequencing techniques of genomics, there is no proteomic method known that consistently quantifies the entire proteome of a sample with a throughput that support cohort analyses. Yet, it is expected that proteomic analyses will be particularly informative because they reflect the biochemical state of the cell. In this presentation we will discuss emerging computational and quantitative proteomic technologies to relate genotypic variation to the proteome. Proteomic data to support such correlations need to be quantitatively accurate, highly reproducible across multiple measurements and samples and generated at high throughput. Ideally, the data also would provide information about spatial arrangement of proteins in the cell. Data with these qualities can now be generated by the targeted proteomic methods selected reaction monitoring (SRM) and, at higher throughput, by SWATH-MS (1). We will discuss the principles of these mass spectrometric methods, discuss the computational challenged they pose for data analysis and demonstrate with selected applications, using genetic reference strain compendia, their ability to determine the effect of genetic variability on the quantitative proteome, thus functionally connecting the genome to the proteome (2,3).

Research 

Faculty Profile

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Andrew Dillin (UC, Berkeley) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/455-dillin http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/455-dillin Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, May 18, 2016 - Wed, May 18, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
Photo of Andrew Dillin 
Andrew Dillin
Howard Hughes Investigator
Siebel Distinguished Chair in Stem Cell Biology
Professor of Genetics, Genomics and Development
University of California, Berkeley

Seminar Topic

Orchestrating aging across a troubled soma

Recently, we have reported that mitochondria can communicate intracellular stress between tissues in C. elegans, in which an induction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) in the neurons is sensed and reacted to by mitochondria within physically distinct, non-innervated tissues (Durieux et al., 2011). Because of the dual role for the UPRmt in both proteostasis and metabolism, we have hypothesized that metabolic sensors mediate the cell non-autonomous signaling of mitochondrial proteotoxic stress. To explore this possibility, we examined models of proteotoxic stress in C. elegans neurons for evidence of secondary effects on distal mitochondrial stress responses. In our analyses, we found that expression of a polyglutamine tract of a specific length (PolyQ40) expressed in neurons is sufficient to elicit a mitochondrial stress response in distal tissues. Association of the PolyQ protein with mitochondria correlates with the distal upregulation of the UPRmt and physiologic changes in the entire animal. Upregulation of the UPRmt pathway in peripheral tissues requires the function of UPRmt components as well as dense core vesicle secretion from affected neurons. The application of exogenous serotonin, a cargo of dense core vesicles, is sufficient to rescue the defect in neuronal secretion and restore UPRmt signaling. Importantly, a loss in serotonin synthesis is sufficient to block cell non-autonomous UPRmt signaling to distal tissues, an effect rescued by the application of exogenous serotonin. Together, these findings provide evidence that misfolded proteins invoke the neuroendocrine signaling of metabolic stress, altering mitochondrial function and metabolism throughout the organism. These findings suggest a mechanistic link between mitochondrial proteostasis, endocrine signaling, and the peripheral metabolic decline found in neurodegenerative disease states, such as Huntington’s Disease.

Research lab

The Dillin Lab

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Jo Handelsman (White House) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/513-handelsman http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/513-handelsman Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: Butler Seminar Series
Date: Wed, May 18, 2016 - Wed, May 18, 2016
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Butler Seminar Series

Speaker
 Image result for jo handelsman white house
Jo Handelsman
Associate Director for Science
White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

Seminar Topic

Making Science Policy at the White House: What’s a Government to Do?

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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Butler Seminar Series Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:09:18 -0400
Developing Optimism http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/501-developing-optimism http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/501-developing-optimism Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 005 - Princeton
Category: Mindfulness Workshop
Date: Thu, May 19, 2016 - Thu, May 19, 2016
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For faculty, staff, postdocs, and graduate students

Developing Optimism

Looking on the bright side even when things go wrong is a key component of optimism, which research links to a better ability to cope with stress. Many of us have a tendency to look on the bright side very rarely. Mindfulness skills can help us to direct our attention towards possibilities and opportunities that we might be missing.

Facilitated by Shefalika Gandhi, LCSW

http://uhs.princeton.edu/about-us/staff/shefalika-gandhi-lcsw

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Mindfulness Workshop Thu, 18 Dec 2014 14:07:07 -0500