Princeton University Molecular Biology - Calendar of Events http://molbio.princeton.edu Wed, 23 Apr 2014 09:00:56 -0400 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Steven McCarroll (Harvard University) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/285-McCarroll http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/285-McCarroll Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Apr 09, 2014 - Wed, Apr 09, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Web - No PhotoSteven McCarroll
Harvard University

Steve McCarroll is a professor in the Genetics Department of Harvard Medical School. He is the Director of Genetics at the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute.

Steve was a Ph.D. student in Cori Bargmann’s lab (genetics and neuroscience in C. elegans) at U.C. San Francisco, then a postdoc in David Altshuler’s lab (human genetic polymorphism and the genetic basis of complex phenotypes) at MGH and the Broad Institute.

 

Seminar Topic

Where is the rest of the human genome?

Whole-genome sequencing is increasingly used to search for genetic variants underlying human disease.  In this seminar, I will describe ways in which every sequencing experiment can also be used to teach us surprising things about how genomes work in everyone.  First, there is extensive human genome sequence that is missing from maps of the human genome – but using a combination of mathematics and historical mixtures of human populations, we learned where these genes have been hiding and how they have remained hidden from view.  Second, we find that some regions of the human genome segregate in many different structural forms within human populations, an "extreme" form of structural variation that is contributing to human phenotypes.  Third, we developed ways to use whole genome sequence data to study active processes of DNA replication in human cells, with a surprising finding about how DNA replication varies from person to person.

 

Research Lab

 The McCarroll Lab

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Stephen Kowalczykowski (UC Davis) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/274-Kowalczykowski http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/274-Kowalczykowski Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Apr 16, 2014 - Wed, Apr 16, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Stephen KowalczykowskiStephen Kowalczykowski
University of California, Davis

Dr. Stephen Kowalczykowski received his Ph.D. in chemistry and biochemistry with Dr. Jacinto Steinhardt at Georgetown University.  His postdoctoral training was with Dr. Peter von Hippel at the University of Oregon.  Dr. Kowalczykowski started his independent faculty career in 1981 at Northwestern University Medical School. In 1991, he relocated to the University of California at Davis with the rank of Full Professor. He subsequently served as the Chair of Microbiology and the Director of the Center for Genetics and Development; currently, he is a Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, and of Molecular and Cell Biology.  Dr. Kowalczykowski’s honors include election to the National Academy of Sciences (2007), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2005), the American Academy of Microbiology (2003), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2001). Dr. Kowalczykowski’s research programs focus on the molecular mechanisms of recombinational DNA repair; the biochemical functions of DNA helicases; single-molecule biophysical analysis of protein-nucleic acid interactions; and BRCA2 and the molecular etiology of breast cancer.

Seminar Topic

Single-Molecule Visualization of Protein-DNA Complexes: Understanding Biology, One Molecule at a Time 

We can now watch individual proteins acting on single molecules of DNA. Visualization is achieved by capturing a single DNA molecule with optical traps or by tethering to a glass surface. Proteins are visualized via fluorescent reporters, and molecules are manipulated using microfluidic flowcells. Using these approaches, we have imaged proteins functioning in the homology-directed repair of DNA breaks. We can image the search for DNA homology conducted by the RecA, the self-assembly of RecA and RAD51 on DNA, and the function of mediators such as RecFOR and BRCA2.

Research Lab

 http://microbiology.ucdavis.edu/kowalczykowski/

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Robert Weinberg (MIT) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/340-Weinberg http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/340-Weinberg Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Tue, Apr 29, 2014 - Tue, Apr 29, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Robert WeinbergRobert Weinberg
MIT

Dr. Robert A. Weinberg is a Founding Member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and the American Cancer Society and Daniel K. Ludwig Professor for Cancer Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).  

Dr. Weinberg and his colleagues used transfection to identify the first human cancer-causing gene, the ras oncogene, and the first known tumor suppressor gene, RB, the retinoblastoma gene. Subsequently, his group isolated the hTERT gene encoding the telomerease enzyme and used this gene, together with others, to create the first genetically defined human cancer cells.   Their discovery that a series of transcription factors (Twist, Goosecoid, FOXC2) can program multiple steps of the invasion-metastasis cascade holds the promise of revealing how cancer cells within primary tumors are able to disseminate in the bodies of cancer patients, generating the metastases that are responsible for 90% of cancer-associated mortality. 

Dr. Weinberg is the author or editor of five books and more than 350 articles.  Among these are three books, intended for a lay audience: “One Renegade Cell”, "Racing to the Beginning of the Road: The Search for the Origin of Cancer" and "Genes and the Biology of Cancer," co-authored with Dr. Harold E. Varmus.  More recently, he has written a textbook, “The Biology of Cancer”.  He is an elected Member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  He is a Member of the American Philosophical Society and the Institute of Medicine. 

Among Dr. Weinberg's many honors and awards are the Discover Magazine 1982 Scientist of the Year, the National Academy of Sciences/U.S. Steel Foundation Award in Molecular Biology, the Sloan Prize of the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation, the Bristol-Myers Award for Distinguished Achievement in Cancer Research, the Harvey Prize from the American Society for Technion/Israel Institute of Technology, the Gairdner Foundation International Award, the Keio Medical Foundation Prize, the 1997 National Medal of Science, the 2004 Wolf Foundation Prize, and the Prince of Asturias Science Prize.  He has served on scientific advisory boards for the Institute of Molecular Pathology in Vienna, Austria, the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot, Israel, and the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

Born in Pittsburgh in 1942, Dr. Weinberg received his B.S. (1964) and Ph.D. (1969) degrees in Biology from MIT. He undertook postdoctoral research at the Weizmann Institute and the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, and then returned to MIT in 1972.  In 1982, he was appointed Professor of Biology at MIT and that year became one of the Founding Members of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, also in Cambridge, MA.  In 2006 he was appointed as Director of MIT’s Ludwig Center for Cancer Research.

 

Seminar Topic

 

 

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Robert Weinberg (MIT) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/283-Weinberg http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/283-Weinberg Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, Apr 30, 2014 - Wed, Apr 30, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Robert WeinbergRobert Weinberg
MIT

Dr. Robert A. Weinberg is a Founding Member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and the American Cancer Society and Daniel K. Ludwig Professor for Cancer Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).  

Dr. Weinberg and his colleagues used transfection to identify the first human cancer-causing gene, the ras oncogene, and the first known tumor suppressor gene, RB, the retinoblastoma gene. Subsequently, his group isolated the hTERT gene encoding the telomerease enzyme and used this gene, together with others, to create the first genetically defined human cancer cells.   Their discovery that a series of transcription factors (Twist, Goosecoid, FOXC2) can program multiple steps of the invasion-metastasis cascade holds the promise of revealing how cancer cells within primary tumors are able to disseminate in the bodies of cancer patients, generating the metastases that are responsible for 90% of cancer-associated mortality. 

Dr. Weinberg is the author or editor of five books and more than 350 articles.  Among these are three books, intended for a lay audience: “One Renegade Cell”, "Racing to the Beginning of the Road: The Search for the Origin of Cancer" and "Genes and the Biology of Cancer," co-authored with Dr. Harold E. Varmus.  More recently, he has written a textbook, “The Biology of Cancer”.  He is an elected Member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  He is a Member of the American Philosophical Society and the Institute of Medicine. 

Among Dr. Weinberg's many honors and awards are the Discover Magazine 1982 Scientist of the Year, the National Academy of Sciences/U.S. Steel Foundation Award in Molecular Biology, the Sloan Prize of the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation, the Bristol-Myers Award for Distinguished Achievement in Cancer Research, the Harvey Prize from the American Society for Technion/Israel Institute of Technology, the Gairdner Foundation International Award, the Keio Medical Foundation Prize, the 1997 National Medal of Science, the 2004 Wolf Foundation Prize, and the Prince of Asturias Science Prize.  He has served on scientific advisory boards for the Institute of Molecular Pathology in Vienna, Austria, the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot, Israel, and the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

Born in Pittsburgh in 1942, Dr. Weinberg received his B.S. (1964) and Ph.D. (1969) degrees in Biology from MIT. He undertook postdoctoral research at the Weizmann Institute and the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, and then returned to MIT in 1972.  In 1982, he was appointed Professor of Biology at MIT and that year became one of the Founding Members of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, also in Cambridge, MA.  In 2006 he was appointed as Director of MIT’s Ludwig Center for Cancer Research.

 

Seminar Topic

 

 

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Daniel Geschwind (UCLA) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/282-Geschwind http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/282-Geschwind Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, May 07, 2014 - Wed, May 07, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Web - No PhotoDaniel Geschwind
UCLA

 

 

 

 

Seminar Topic

"Integrative genomics in autism: A model for connecting genes to brain to behavior in neuropsychiatric disease"

 

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Eric Verdin (University of California, San Francisco) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/280-Verdin http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/280-Verdin Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, May 14, 2014 - Wed, May 14, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

1225Eric Verdin
University of California, San Francisco

 

 

 

 

 

Seminar Topic

 Sirtuins and Mitochondrial Protein Acylation

Three NAD-dependent protein deacylases, SIRT3, SIRT4 and SIRT5, have been identified in mitochondria. I will review the post translational modifications they regulate, acetylation, succinylation and malonylation, and their biological significance under normal and pathological conditions.

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400
Mina Bissell (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/279-Bissell http://molbio.princeton.edu/events/all/event/279-Bissell Location: Lewis Thomas Lab, 003 - Princeton
Category: MolBio Seminar Series
Date: Wed, May 21, 2014 - Wed, May 21, 2014
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MolBio Seminar Series

Speaker

Web - No PhotoMina Bissell
Life Sciences Division
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

 

 

 

 

Seminar Topic

 “The critical role of Extracellular Matrix and Microenvironment in metastasis and dormancy”

 

Research Lab

 

 

Audience

Free and open to the university community and the public

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MolBio Seminar Series Wed, 29 Jun 2011 11:54:12 -0400